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Category: Animated

May 20th, 2018 by Gigi Teen Geek

By Gigi

Calling all Street Fighter fans! Here’s a chance to have some of your work featured in the upcoming pin-up 2018 Street Fighter: Summer Sports Special. The pinup will be released this summer in August. Wouldn’t it be awesome to have your work displayed next to the drawings of UDON artists? If I had any drawing ability, I would be all over this cool fanart competition. This is great opportunity to gain exposure for your craft! 

They are looking for summer themed artwork, but no nudity!. I recommend including swimsuits, the beach, sports, or anything summer related in your piece. Unfortunately, for younger fans, there is an age limit of at least 16. You can submit here. The deadline is June 5.

 

Here are the rules you must obey to submit your work:

  • artwork must feature at least one character from the STREET FIGHTER video game series
  • you may not include characters from other Capcom or non-Capcom games/properties
  • characters not allowed include those exclusive the Street Fighter EX series, and the character of Ingrid
  • you may not include your own original characters
  • artwork may be sexy but no nudity please
  • artwork should not feature alcohol, smoking, or drug use.
  • entrants must be at least 16 years of age at time of submission
  • by submitting your artwork, you are giving UDON permission to publish it in the Street Fighter: Summer Sports Special in 2018. along with
    • your name or pseudonym
    • your country and state.
  • please feel free to show off your submission online any time! We’d love if you add the hashtag #SFcomicfanart
  • all art styles are welcome
  • ideal artwork shape is 7 x 11″. While low resolution previews are used for submissions, we suggest you create your artwork at 300dpi+ (if selected, we may request the higher resolution file from you for printing)
  • artwork submission deadline is June 5, 2018

 

Do you plan on submitting any original creations? If so, make sure to comment and share what you’re drawing! Make sure to use the hashtag when you submit!

 

Posted in Animated, art, Geek Fun, Los Angeles Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

May 11th, 2018 by Cherry

“Jack Kirby’s 2001: A Space Odyssey comics were pure Kosmic Kirby at the top of his craft, expanding on the 2001 story in ways not even masters like Kubrick or Clarke could have imagined,” says Kirby Museum Acting Director, Rand Hoppe. “We can’t wait for fans to have their minds blown by the stories AND the visuals.”

If your in the NYC area you have to check out the “A Jack Kirby Odyssey” from May 11-13! It’s a celebration of the King of Comics’ pop-up exhibiting Arther C. Clarke and Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey at One Art Space (23 Warren Street, NYC). It’s in celebration of the cinematic masterpiece with a giant reproduction, never seen before pencil art and multimedia presentations.

“The comics on display for A Jack Kirby Odyssey were painstakingly reproduced from the photocopies of Kirby’s pencil art,” adds Kirby Museum President, Tom Kraft. “The oversized comics at our Kirby 100 birthday celebration at One Art Space were big hits. We expect people will love seeing Kirby’s cosmic pencil art at large size, too.”

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Jack Kirby 100 Highlights Include:

Friday:
5pm – Opening Celebration

Saturday:
1pm – The Jack’d Kirby podcast live!
5pm – Kubrick and Kirby: Mind-Breakers. Hoppe and Romberger in Conversation
7pm – Fake Church with Geoff Grimwood. Improv Comedy!

Sunday:
2pm – Norton’s Odyssey – audio-visual dramatic reading of issues #5&6
4pm – The New Seed! – audio-visual dramatic reading of issue #7
5pm – Closing Celebration

About Us
The Jack Kirby Museum and Research Center is organized exclusively for educational purposes; more specifically, to promote and encourage the study, understanding, preservation, and appreciation of the work of Jack Kirby. Kirby 100 marks our third pop-up event in New York City and we regularly travel the US and Europe putting on and assisting exhibitions and lectures about Mr. Kirby’s life and art.

More programming will be announced shortly. For ongoing updates, check kirbymuseum.org, follow @JackKirbyMuseum on Twitter, and like facebook.com/KirbyMuseum.

Posted in Animated, art, Comic Books, Geek Fun, Geek Travel, museum Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

April 10th, 2018 by Cherry

I had a blast chatting to some of the cast members starring in the latest DC Universe movie Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay at Wondercon. You can buy the new film on Blu-Ray or digital download today. I’m hoping to have a chance to see it to post a review since it was such fun talking to everyone about their characters and of course seeing the clip (see below) that is giving me all the childhood feels! I have to say my roadtrip snack is cinnamon candy and my parents did love a drivethru but with a bunch of ‘heroes’ like them I’d let them do what they want! Lucking Amanda Waller’s in charge of Task Force X and she won’t take any guff from Deadshot, Bronze Tiger, Killer Frost, Captain Boomerang, Harley Quinn and Copperhead on their latest mission!

 

Produced by Warner Bros. Animation, DC Entertainment and Warner Bros. Home Entertainment, Suicide Squad: Hell to Pay finds Amanda Waller’s top secret “Task Force X” – Deadshot, Bronze Tiger, Killer Frost, Captain Boomerang, Harley Quinn and Copperhead – on a mission to retrieve a mystical object so powerful that they’re willing to risk their own lives to steal it. But the Suicide Squad isn’t the only group of villains seeking to possess the object. The race is on for the golden prize … and, to stay alive, second place isn’t an option.

Posted in Animated, Comic Books, Comic Con, geek tv Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 1st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
Composer Mark Rivers shares his experience on Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

       I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Mark Rivers

Rivers is a writer, producer, and composer for television. He is best known for his work on Parks and Recreation, and Kroll Show, and most recently Netflix’s Big Mouth.

 

Q: Can you talk to me about your writing process on Big Mouth?

A: Sure! The process usually goes something like… there are a lot of songs in the show. Not a lot, but they’re enough.

Q: There’s a lot.

A: They’re enough. There’s plenty of songs. Usually, as they’re writing the script, the writers and the producers will hit upon a moment where they think, “You know, this moment could use a musical number,” and that’s when they give me a call… “Hey, episode 208, we got a song coming up for you. We want to talk about that.” So we’ll either get on the phone or we’ll meet at their offices and just talk through what they want this musical moment to be. The style of music… we’ve done everything from big band to disco to flamingo… so I never know what’s coming down the pike. My job is to take that moment and to understand the characters’ voices enough, and to understand the story and the script enough to write lyrics that service that moment. So, I’ll go away and shuffle around in my backyard, write a bunch of lyrics, come up with a song, send them a demo, and… cross my fingers that they like it. Usually, they’ll come back with a few notes here and there, and then I’ll run with it… produce it, get the cast members in to sing it. Turn it into something that works in the show. Beyond that, the scoring is very different. That comes much later, when there’s an animatic to score to. We’ll sit down together and we’ll go through like, “That could use some music right there! What about that?” and we’ll have some temporary library music in place. “I can do something better and bigger, that fits the moment better,” It’s back and forth like that. I’ll send them stuff, they’ll have notes, and then back and forth until we’re all happy with it.

Q: How much freedom are you allowed in that process? Do they let you do whatever you want?

BMI Composer Mark Rivers talks working on Netflix’s Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: Yeah, they trust me to run with it, and if they don’t like what I’ve done they’ll point out why… particularly lyrically. I’m really psyched that they’ve come to just trust me, lyrically. It’s always a bit difficult to inherit a bunch of lyrics… “Stick to these lyrics, don’t change anything…” It compromises the flow of a song. It’s just hard to write music that way. So they give me a lot of freedom… you know, once we’ve agreed upon a direction, the parameters that I should be working within. So yeah. Enough. I’m given enough freedom.

Q: Can I just say that Big Mouth is so, so funny, and I think that the music 

is the funniest part of it.

A: Oh cool! Really? Well, thanks. Thank you

Q: You did Parks & Rec, which is also so funny. I’m just a fan, I guess.

A: Oh good. I’m a fan of the show, too.

Q: What do you do in your free time?

A: I chase my kid around. I have an eight-year-old girl who’s not allowed to watch Big Mouth. I hang out with my wife and my kid.

Q: Do you listen to music? Or is it too much like work?

A: I try to. I have to make the effort to do it. My wife just bought me an Alexa, which immediately my daughter took over. Now she’s got someone to boss around. But I try to listen to more music. I don’t listen to as much as I used to… it’s hard to find stuff that’s like, “Wow, this is new and exciting!” like you did when you were a teenager and in your 20s. I find myself going back to stuff that I liked then… and I watch baseball and I drink beer, stuff like that. But that’s boring.

Q: So I’m really into choir music.

A: Yeah?

Q: Did you ever sing in a choir?

A: Did I ever sing in a choir? When I was a little kid. Well, in high school I sang in the Festival Chorale. I was a band nerd for a while, and then I joined the Festival Chorale because my friends were in it. They got to travel to Washington, D.C. every year and secretly party in the hotel rooms. That’s what I wanted to do.

Q: That’s what everyone wants to do when they go.

A: Yeah, yeah. It was more of the social aspect that drew me than the singing.

Q: Can I ask how you got into scoring, specifically T.V. shows?

A: Yeah… when I was a young man, I knew… I was playing in rock bands forever, but all my friends were comedians. I was living in Boston. I was friends with this whole budding Boston comedy scene. David Cross, who is a very old friend… and Marc Maron, and Louis C.K. and Jon Benjamin… these are all my friends and they liked my band and we would hang out. Years later when I moved to Boston, I had done Mr. Show with Bob and David– an old HBO sketch comedy show-I did that theme song… these guys were starting to get shows. My career as a rock musician had [raspberry sound effect, slams hand on table] grounded out. But these guys were taking off. I got into comedy writing, but also into writing music for these guys because they were old friends. They hired me because they knew me. I suppose they figured, “We can do worse than this guy.”

Q: Do you have a favorite composer?

A: I don’t. I don’t think I do. I mean… Beethoven? Have you heard of Beethoven?

Q: No. Who?

A: I don’t think I do. I have my favorite pop musicians. I was a huge Elvis Costello, XTC fan. That’s what most excited me when I was starting to write rock songs, pop songs. Bowie and The Beatles… other people, too. But I mean, that was sort of the foundation of all the stuff I liked. As far as T.V. composers there are people I like. I’ll hear music on other shows and think, “Oh, that guy’s pretty good! That Dave Porter guy is pretty good!” There’s a guy that does music on a kids show called Masha and the Bear, he writes these great little weird, off-kilter pop songs. They’re really good. Occasionally something will grab my ear, but I wouldn’t say… I’m too old to be a fan of anybody anymore.

Q: Do you read any comics?

A: I don’t. I don’t. The last comic I read… I liked Eightball. I was an Eightball fan. Dan Clowes… I know there are other people sort of like him and in the graphic novel world… I never kept up with it. I have a kid now…

Q: She doesn’t like comics?

A: Not yet! Maybe she’ll get into them. She likes reading. She likes books. She likes Judy Blume.

Q: I loved Judy Blume.

A: She was gonna read Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret and we were like, “No no no no no, not yet!” She’s eight.

Posted in Animated, Comedy, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , , , , ,

April 1st, 2018 by Cherry

I loved the Walt Disney Television Animation and Buena Vista Television animated series Gargoyles created by Greg Weisman (1994 to 1997). Like many fans I’ve wanted more of these characters so am beyond excited that the award-winning filmmaker Carlos Ferrer has made a short short fan film in hopes of getting approval from Disney to helm a movie with the great characters. The series may have been for kids but I watched as young adult and fell in love with the voices, storylines of being ‘out of time’, friendship, loyalty and heroism. If you’ve never seen the series it follows a clan of night creatures aka Gargoyles who protect modern New York City as they did in Scotland when they wake up after nightfall. Ferrer has directed, edited, animated and scored the fan film out of love for the characters and stories.

I need as many views as possible to convince producers and execs that my vision of a live action Gargoyles film will work for audiences and fans. It’s a rich story with a great message – a fantasy set in the real world and with today’s technology it could be fantastic. I grew up with this so I feel like I really know what has to be done. So it’s really about getting as much exposure as possible with the fans and others who may not know about the show“,Carlos Ferrer.

About Carlos Ferrer

Ferrer is an award-winning American filmmaker with over fifteen years experience in production and storytelling. At the age of sixteen, he directed over one hundred cast and crew members on a feature-length film that later won “Best Student Feature” at the Long Island Film Festival. Ferrer studied Film at SUNY Purchase College, graduating in 2008 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Arts & Film. His credits include the 2016 film Retina and short film The Popcorn Man.

What did you think of the short? Leave a comment below if you want to see a feature length live action or animated film of the beloved series ….

Posted in Animated, Film, free, geek tv, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 31st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
(L to R): Composers and panelists Mark Rivers, Tim Kiefer, Ryan Elder, and Tom Howe at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Tom Howe

Howe is an award-winning film and television composer and is most known for his work on Wonder Woman and Legend of Tarzan. He has recently worked on the new animated film Early Man.

 

Q: How’s your Wondercon going? Did you just get here?

A: I just got here, and it’s great. I didn’t realize it was such a big thing. Seeing everyone walking around in their costumes was fantastic. I think Americans do things bigger and better than anywhere else.

Q: Are you from England?

A: I am.

Q: I didn’t know that.

A: Yeah. I’m from there. Lived here four years, though.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about Early Man?

A: Yeah. I came on to that project 10 weeks from when we recorded which was November. My co-writer, who is Harry Gregson-Williams, he called me and asked me if I’d like to co-write the movie with him, and I then flew over to London to meet Nick Park and the team. Hung out there for a couple of days just getting to know everybody, visiting sets, and came back and then we started writing, trying to get things approved because we didn’t have a lot of time before we actually had to record. But the movie was fairly complete by that point. Some things change but a lot of the animation had been done because it takes like four or five years for them to get it together, because it’s very slow. It’s frame by frame filmmaking. It was just a great opportunity to be a part of and a fantastic process.

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

A: My parents are both musical, and…my dad plays the organ, piano, guitar, and things, but he played the organ in church and my mom sung in the choir, so I did a lot of singing when I was younger. I started piano at about four or five or something. I took up the guitar at eight, I think, and then the clarinet later, a few things like that. I studied music and orchestration and things later on. I thought originally I was going to be in a band and be a songwriter. That’s what I really wanted to do, but I got a lot of people asking me to do string arrangements for songs, so I ended up going more in that direction. Somebody who I’d been in college with, who had nothing to do with music, but she got a job at a television channel. She called me they needed some music for a very small thing

Composer of Early Man, Tom Howe talks animation at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

they were doing. A two minute long student film that they were putting out that day, and I did that. I’d suddenly found that I’d switched directions from what I thought I was gonna do to writing music for media. After that, that producer went on to do something else and I worked with him, then. One thing sort of snowballed to the other. I always knew I was going to do music, whether it was songwriting or film work or whatever.

 

Q: What music do you listen to in your free time?

A: Uhm….

Q: If you like to listen to music in your free time.

A: Funnily enough, because you’re on a film or T.V. show and you’re writing music it can be 18 hours a day for six-and-a-half days a week, sometimes seven when you’re getting near the end. There isn’t really a lot of time to listen to music outside of that, and I almost don’t want to. So I actually I find I listen to a lot of talk radio because I want to hear something but I need it to be almost like white noise that just distracts me rather than something musical. But if I get the chance… I’ve got three kids who listen to all kinds of different things. Usually, it will be whatever they’re listening to, because if we’re driving somewhere in the car, that will take priority over whatever I want to listen to.

Q: You talked a little bit about being in choirs?

A: Yeah.

Q: I love choir. Do you have a favorite choir composer?

A: Yeah, I love Morten Lauridsen, who I think is amazing. He and actually Eric Whitacre is another guy. Eric Whitacre is quite similar to Morten Lauridsen, but there’s a piece called “O Magnum Mysterium” by Lauridsen and I think it’s fantastic. The really close kind of voice writing. A lot of divisi cuts and clashes but… I don’t think there’s anything like the voice… strings get pretty close maybe, but I think that there’s nothing like just voices for everything, really. For emotion, for written things… one of the films I remember seeing growing up was a film called Cry Freedom. This sort of fantastic African choir, just the sound of it obliterated everything else in the movie in terms of the musical stuff. I thought they were amazing. But those are probably the two that I’ve been listening to, recently anyway. I think they’re both great.

Q: I sang that piece in high school.

A: Really?

Q: I loved it. It was beautiful.

A: It’s great, isn’t it?

Q: It was a lot of work.

A: I was gonna say, it’s not an easy thing to sing. There’s a lot or very close writing that then resolves, isn’t it? You’re clashing for quite a bit. But yeah, it’s a great piece of music.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about your role in the Wonder Woman movie?

A: Sure, yes. I was an additional composer on that movie for Rupert Gregson-Williams. That really involves… well, on a movie like that there was, again not a lot of time to put it together, but also there’s a lot of minutes of music. So, I’ll take on some scenes, basically, on Rupert’s behalf and I’ll either take a theme that he’s written-obviously all the main themes are by him and he’s doing the bulk of the movie- and I’ll work that theme into the scene that I’m doing. Or it could be a stand-alone scene that therefore isn’t hugely affecting the arc, then I’ll take that on just to kind of mean that he has not got to do it. So I probably took eight or nine, ten scenes in the movie, something like that. Just try to help out, really. It’s not uncommon on some of these big movies to have one or two other people kind of running alongside you trying to get it all done. Particularly when on a movie of that scale, where the picture’s changing a lot, so there’s a lot of musical conforms to do as well as writing. You’re permanently trying to keep up with the latest version of the picture. It’s just a lot of work that needs to be done. I’ve done that on several different movies for different people, but it’s a great thing to do, I think because you get the experience of working on a huge movie-you’re part of it, your music’s going into the film-but you slightly can stand back from the pressure of being in the firing line as the lead composer if they don’t like it at all. You can learn a lot doing it. It’s good fun. The movie turned out well didn’t it? It was huge. It was very successful.

Q: I loved that movie.

A: Second one’s coming.

Q: Do you read comics at all?

A: I haven’t for many years. A friend of mine collects the original ones and he seems to have an amazing collection of very valuable comics, as well. Do you collect them?

Q: I don’t collect them because I’ve seen that it’s not valuable. But it’s cool to read, I guess. If I really like a piece then I’ll buy it. How much freedom do get when you’re composing?

A: It depends on the project actually. Fairly- initially, anyway- a fairly big degree of flexibility in what you can do and theme ideas, and things. But, fundamentally, writing film music you’re always serving the filmmakers vision, the studio, the other people involved. So you have to respect that. I think sometimes, in the case of like Early Man. I was on for ten weeks, Nick Park was on for six years, so he’s going to have a better idea of what it is and what he wants than I am. I can’t absorb that in that short amount of time, and I have to start writing straight away. I’ve only got ten days before I’m trying to be at the same speed. I think you do get freedom, but at the same time people know what they want and you are trying to serve a higher purpose. Otherwise, you can go write concert music.

 

Follow Tom Howe on Twitter: @howe_tom

Posted in Animated, art, Comic Books, Comic Con, Film, geek tv, Movie, music, TV Tagged with: , , , ,

March 30th, 2018 by Aiyonna White

By Aiyonna White, Contributor

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Ryan Elder

Elder is a television and film composer best known for his work on Rick and Morty. He has also composed music for The Wizards of Waverly Place and the upcoming Boss Baby television series.

 

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: When I was a kid my family was very musical. I took violin lessons when I was five and my dad had a little recording studio in our home, and he would help me write songs and produce them. I would write boyband songs when I was seven. So I’ve always been in music then in college I got a degree in composition, and after college, I had an opportunity to do an internship at a company that did music for commercials. I started working with them and I did commercial music for about 11 years and then during that time I became friends with the creators of Rick and Morty and they brought me on when it was time to do the show.

Q: How much freedom do you get in composing music or picking which songs go into an episode?

A: For picking the songs, I’m not involved in that, generally. That’s some other people. Showrunners or producers pick the songs. For the original music that I write, I actually get a ton of freedom. Basically, they send me the cuts with no music and I just do whatever I want. I get a lot of freedom. They generally like what I do and don’t have a ton of notes for me. What you hear is my idea. It’s pretty sweet. I’m pretty lucky.  

Q: You have some great songs. My friends and I sang “Get Schwifty” for at least a year after we saw the episode.

A: [laughter]

Q: In the video you did with “Great Big Story” you talked about musical easter eggs. Can you tell me another one?

A: [laughter] I think when we filmed that episode seven of season three wasn’t out yet… it’s hard to explain. They’re not so point-outable as the “Jerry Daycare” one I mentioned in that video. In episode seven, I think it’s called “The Ricklantis Mixup,” I created a whole new sound of music for that episode. So there’s a lot of callbacks to the same sort of thematic material in that episode which I don’t always do. I barely ever use the theme song as a part of the score, just a couple of times. One time when Pickle Rick jumps out of the toilet, and stuff like that… so… yeah. Sorry, it’s not the most satisfying answer.

Q: That’s okay. Can you tell me about the process that you go through when you’re composing a piece?

A: I try to be as informed by the story that’s being told as much as possible. For me, the most important thing is helping to tell the story. The first thing I usually do is watch the episode and figure out, “Okay, do I have any questions about what’s happening here- questions about character motivations-is the audience supposed to feel tense in this scene or are the characters tense and we’re not?” For me, the first step is just nailing down, “What moods do I need to hit here to tell the story the way that Justin and Dan, the creators, want?” Then, after that, it’s like…  as with any composer we all have like a bag of tricks that we pull from. And I could get really inside baseball and tell you like “Oh, I use the tremolo strings when I need this and blah blah blah,” but the basic thing is, I have the sounds that I go to for different moods and it’s all dependent on the mood or the story that needs to be told.

Q: Are some things easier to score than others?

A: Absolutely. There’s definitely scenes where the music is very much taking a backseat and in those scenes, it’s a lot of just pressing one note on the keyboard for a long time. Those are easy, right? Some are like very much more challenging, like writing the songs. “Goodbye Moonmen,” that was like a process. It didn’t take me very long once I started writing the music but I needed to prepare by listening to a bunch of David Bowie and figuring out how those lyrics were gonna work… y’know… it just depends.

Q: Just really quick, did you do “Get Schwifty”? Was that you?

A: I did not. I’ll talk about it in the panel, actually.

Q: I’m so sorry.

A: No, that’s okay. Because… this is one of the questions from the panel, actually, but those songs were done for a really small flash game that Adult Swim released. It was a mobile game or something. Morty finds Summer’s iPod in that game, and on the iPod, there’re three songs, and they all are featured in Season 2. “Get Schwifty” and “Head Bent Over” are two of them. Justin just improvised those lyrics over some stock music. When it came time to do the episode of “Get Schwifty” all the writers loved those songs so much from the game they said, “Let’s do a whole episode based around these songs,” At that point, it was like,  “Let’s not reinvent the wheel. These songs are funny. Let’s keep the music as is.” I wasn’t really involved with them. I mean, I kinda mixed and mastered to make them sound good for T.V.  but for the most part, it was just Justin improvising lyrics over these stock music.

BMI Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

 

Q: What do you like to listen to in your free time?

A: I like a lot of moody… [laughter] I listen to sad music. My wife always gives me shit about it but right now I’m into Sufjan Stevens

 

Q: I love him!

A: Yeah, Carrie & Lowell, I think is like one of the best records of all time.

 

Q: When he sang at the Oscars I was just [grabs chest dramatically].

A: Ugh. So good. And then, I’m into this band Tennis, if you know Tennis. One of the reasons I got into them is because they invited me to their show. They’re big fans of Rick and Morty, so it’s like, “Oh, I’ll become fans of you guys then,”…y’know, I tend to listen to… if I’m going to listen to new stuff it’s a lot of stuff that my friends and people I know are working on. That’s the short answer.

Q: So, I’m really into choir.

A: Okay.

Q: Just out of curiosity, have you ever sung in a choir?

A: I was in my high school choir and then in college, I was in an acapella group. The Macalester Traditions, I’ll shout them out. It was fun. [laughter] I learned a lot about-because I would do arrangements for them, in addition to singing- I would arrange a lot of the songs that we sang. So I learned a lot of stuff doing that, that I use on a regular basis. All the background vocals on “Goodbye Moonmen” are stuff that I would have done in the acapella group for sure. I want to hear an acapella group do “Goodbye Moonmen,” I hope there’s one out there that wants to try it.

Q: Do you have a favorite composer right now?

A: My all time favorite film composer is Jerry Goldsmith. I’m super influenced by him a lot. I mean, he was a master, and just incredible. He did some of my favorite movies, and certainly some of my favorite scores, like “The Planet of the Apes” score. It’s just mind-blowing. Whenever I get stuck on Rick and Morty, i’ll just put on the “Alien” score or something and try to be inspired by that. He’s definitely up there.

Q: What other music do you listen to?

A: I’ll just list off things. We just got Spotify, so I’ve been re-exploring stuff from when I was in high school and I’m old, so it’s all 90’s alternative stuff. I’m also way into… went way down the rabbit hole into “New Jack Swing” which is a style of music that was only around for like, five years in the late 80’s early 90’s. It was really specific. Bobby Brown, Ronnie DeVoe, these bands that did this really specific style of music. I got way into that and just started listening to every song I could find of that. As far as new stuff, I really like Miike Snow, if you know that group… Haim. I like pop music that is not radio pop music, but it’s pop-y. Things with good hooks, good melodies, that’s what I look for in what I listen to for fun. It’s hard as a composer, I will say, and I bet these other guys here with me today will say the same thing. When your hobby becomes your job, then your job is your hobby. You don’t really want to listen to more music on your time off. So I listen to a lot of comedy podcasts and stuff like that.

Q: Which ones?

A: I’m a huge “Comedy Bang! Bang!” Fan. My friend’s podcast “Beyond Yacht Rock Podcast” is really good. They come up with a new genre of music every week. It’s really fun. Any of the Earwolf stuff, the Comedy Bang! Bang! Spin-offs. I listen to my bosses podcast “Harmontown”, fairly regularly to see what’s going on with him. I shouldn’t tell him I listen to that. [laughter] I’ve been getting into the true crime podcasts like everyone else.

Q: Do you read comics?

A: When I was a kid I collected them. In the 90’s there was this huge boom when Image and Valiant were new publishers and everyone wanted them. I collected them because I thought they were gonna worth something. I read them, too- which I know is not a good combo. Reading them, and thinking they’re going to be worth something don’t really go well together. But, I haven’t read comics much lately. But I like comics, actually. I have so many hobbies. I play Magic: The Gathering all the time. I just have too many hobbies. Can’t make time for everything.

 

Follow Ryan Elder on Twitter: @RyanElderMusic

Posted in Animated, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , ,

February 19th, 2018 by Cherry

It’s the beginning of the end for Star War’s Rebels on Disney XD tonight starting at (9:00 p.m.) with two episodes ‘Jedi Night’ and ‘Dume’ as fans count down to the series finale on Monday, March 5th. It’s going to be three weeks of double episodes every Monday. 

 

STAR WARS REBELS – FEBRUARY 19, 2018 (9:00 – 10:00 p.m. ET/PT)

“Jedi Night” finds our intrepid rebellious heroes infiltrating the Imperial Hdq. in Lothal to save Hera (I think) and the second episode of the night is ‘Dume’ as the crew works to find a new purpose and resolve.

 

 

The two new “Star Wars Rebels” episodes – “Jedi Night” and “DUME” – will also be available on www.DisneyNOW.com at 10:00 p.m. PT after they air on Disney XD.

Follow @DisneyChannelPR and @StarWars for the latest news on #StarWarsRebels,

and check out StarWars.com  for more exciting news on the series.

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Posted in Animated, geek tv, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 31st, 2018 by Cherry

Get ready to be ‘Static Shock’ with the release of the complete third season of the beloved animated series. The two-disc package is available on wb.com/warnerarchive and online retailers. It’s a great series that I watched back in the 2000’s and perfect to revisit or introduce to new fans aka kids or new to the geek world before seeing Black Panther <grrr>

 

“In the third season, everything sort of got spruced up,” recalls LaMarr, known far and wide for his voice performances in Samurai Jack, Futurama and Family Guy, and his live-action roles for MADtv and Pulp Fiction. “The writing was just as good as ever, but they really raised the stakes. Static’s costume went from homemade to a legitimate super hero costume, Richie became his own super hero in Gear, and that meant there was less sitting back at headquarters – we started going on a lot more duo-action adventures.”

Static Shock – Toys in the Hood (S3 E9)

“Moreover, it was so great to finally have a black super hero who didn’t have ‘black’ in his name. I could relate to him. Here’s a kid who is smart, who’s trying to do the right thing, dealing with relatable problems whether it was family or school or friendships. Despite that fact that it was a cartoon that revolved around super heroes, it felt real to me.”

Phil LaMarr starred as Virgil Hawkins/Static for the entire series run and the release of the third season saw a major shift in the show with important guest appearances, upgrade to his tech and integration in the overall universe. Static got a new costume, Richie his BFF/partner-in-crime-fighting became the super hero Gear and the duo fought crime with some major baddies. All of this feels like a direct line to the upcoming Black Panther since Static ‘returned to Africa’ to find his roots, teamed up with the Justice League and Superman. LaMarr & Marsden worked together on the Disney animated series ‘The Weekenders’ which really made enriched their chemistry as friends IRL and animation!

Static Shock & Gear

“Static Shock provided a second opportunity to play partners and best friends – which was great because we were already good friends,” LaMarr says. “Our friendship on the show was authentic. And there’s nothing better than getting paid every week to work with your friend.”

LaMarr’s connection to Static appealed to him in so many ways as a fan and as someone who was once a black teenage boy. “As a comic book guy, Static was a dream come true – a character who really felt real to me,” LaMarr says. “I always thought Static would be what I would be if I got powers as a teenager. I loved Spidey and Bats, but I never wanted to be them. There are tortured souls, and everything they do is informed by that guilt. For Static, the worst problem was having to do his homework.

Static Shock: The Complete Third Season featured numerous guest performances from actors as acclaimed and diverse as four-time Emmy Award winner Alfre Woodard (Miss Evers’ Boys, Desperate Housewives, Hill Street Blues), Emmy Award winner Roscoe Lee Browne (Logan’s Run, The Cowboys), Brock Peters (To Kill A Mockingbird, Soylent Green), Golden Globe winner Terence Stamp (Billy Budd, Superman), three-time Emmy Award winner Jean Smart (24, Garden State), Bud Court (Harold & Maude, M*A*S*H), Dennis Haysbert (24, Major League), Golden Globe winner Ron Perlman (Hellboy), Michael Jai White (Black Dynamite, The Dark Knight), T’Keyah Crystal Keymah (In Living Color, That’s So Raven), Danica McKeller (The Wonder Years), Phil Morris (Smallville), Charles Rocket (Moonlighting), Sean Patrick Thomas (The District), Kimberly Brooks (Mass Effect), Bumper Robinson (The Game), David Faustino (Married With Children), Nicolette Sheridan (Desperate Housewives), David Arquette (Cougar Town), Tia Texada (Third Watch) and rapper Romeo Miller.

Also performing guest roles during Static Shock: The Complete Third Season are the voices of Warner Bros. Animation’s core group of DC Super Heroes, including actors from Batman: The Animated Series (Kevin Conroy, Efrem Zimbalist Jr., Arleen Sorkin, Robert Hastings) and Justice League/Justice League Unlimited (George Newbern, Carl Lumbly, Maria Canals Barrera, Michael Rosenbaum), as well as Phil LaMarr himself as the voice of Green Lantern/John Stewart.

Static Shock, Gear & the Justice League

“The crossover episodes with the Justice League were so much fun for me – it was great to feel like Static Shock was part of the legacy of the super hero entertainment that I grew up watching and reading,” LaMarr says. “Associating Static with the Justice League sort of legitimized our little show, putting Static on the same level as supers like Batman, Green Lantern and all the rest. Plus getting to act again alongside my Justice League acting pals – Maria Canals Barrera, Susan Eisenberg, Carl Lumbly, Michael Rosenbaum, George Newbern, Kevin Conroy – was a blast, especially because now they were coming to MY house. It was actually a little weird because we were sitting in the same chairs as we always did when recording Justice League – but now I had more lines. Of course, I had two different characters – Static and Green Lantern John Stewart.”

Image result for static shock green lantern season 3 LaMarr said the dual role – which put him in the unusual position of recording two characters talking to each other – was the first time he encountered that situation in his career.

 “I thought the writers wrote those scenes as a challenge for me,” LaMarr recalls. “At least they didn’t have them singing harmony or something crazy like that!”

 Static Shock: The Complete Third Season features an all-star lineup of writers behind the scripts: Paul Dini, Dwayne McDuffie, Len Uhley, Ernie Altbacker, John Semper, Courtney Lilly and Adam Beechen. For the Static-Superman team-up episode entitled “Toys in the Hood,” Semper crafted a story that was written by Academy Award winner John Ridley (12 Years a Slave).

 An episode entitled “Static in Africa” saw the Hawkins family on vacation in Ghana, where Static teams with a legendary African folk hero to combat a group of bandits. The episode was particularly important to LaMarr.

 

Static in Africa

“Static in Africa was a blast for so many reasons,” LaMarr recalls. “It was a thrill to work for the first time with Michael Jai White and Roscoe Lee Browne, as well as my Justice League castmate Carl Lumbly. Carl and Roscoe are guys whose work I’d seen growing up, and to share a studio with them was fantastic.

 

 “Moreover, it was really cool to be able to explore our roots in a Saturday morning cartoon. I had never seen contemporary Africa on Saturday morning – an Africa that was not unlike our own world. We have super heroes, they have super heroes. Africa wasn’t showed as exotica – it was a world where people like us live. And to me, that was a great part of Static Shock. It wasn’t about that Static was black; but he was black. His life, his world – those were real. And that kind of normalization is what’s key to true diversity.”

 

The Static Shock: The Complete Third Season two-disc set includes the following animated episodes:

 

Disc One

Hard As Nails

Gear

Static in Africa

Shebang

The Usual Suspect

A League Of Their Own, Part 1

A League Of Their Own, Part 2

Showtime

Romeo in the Mix

 

Disc Two

Toys In The Hood

The Parent Trap

Flashback

Blast From The Past

 

Disc Two also includes the Superman: The Animated Series episode entitled “Obsession” (Season 3, Episode 4), which ultimately served as a prequel to the Static Shock episode, “Toys in the Hood” and spotlighted the first meeting of Superman and Static, featuring the voices of Tim Daly (Superman), Nancy Travis (Darci Mason), Bud Cort (The Toyman) and Joely Fisher (Lana Lang).

 

Warner Archive Collection (WAC) continues to serve as host to some of the most beloved films, television series and animated entertainment in history – and many are now available on Blu-ray. WAC’s canon runs the gamut from restored and remastered Blu-ray classics such as The Americanization of Emily, The Big Sleep, The Great Race, She Wore a Yellow Ribbon, Victor/Victoria and Yankee Doodle Dandy to adored TV offerings such as Longmire (on Blu-ray), Alice and Family Matters (on DVD) to feature-length animated films, including the recent Blu-ray release of Batman: Mask of the Phantasm, to animated TV series headed by recent Blu-ray releases such as Justice League Unlimited, Teen Titans, Batman: The Brave and the Bold and Young Justice, as well as a wealth of classic animated series on DVD including dozens of Hanna-Barbera classics. WAC offerings can be found via wb.com/warnerarchive and your favorite online retailer.

 

I was a HUGE fan of this series and am so happy it will now be available for me to fangirl as well as introduce to my young relatives. Leave a comment below on your favorite episode and whom you plan to introduce to Static!

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January 29th, 2018 by Cherry

Attend the special world premier of the LEGO® DC SUPER HEROES: THE FLASH at The Paley Center for Media (465 North Beverly Drive in Beverly Hills) on Saturday, February 10 at 12:00PM with free tickets for fans of all ages. This family friendly Saturday screening will have a film talent panel, signed posters and LEGO® Toys for All Kids (and maybe the kids at heart <guffaw>. Attendees will have the chance to hear a panel after the screening including James Arnold Taylor (voice of Flash), Troy Baker (Batman), Grey Griffin (Wonder Woman, Lois Lane), Phil LaMarr (Firestorm) and Eric Bauza (The Atom, B’dg, Jimmy Olsen) and executive producer Brandon Vietti, writers Jim Krieg & Jeremy Adams before the release of the film on 2/13/18 on Digital HD; 3/13/18 on Blu-Ray Combo Pack & DVD.

In LEGO DC Super Heroes: The Flash, Reverse-Flash manipulates the Speed Force to put The Flash into a time loop that forces him to relive the same day over and over again – with progressively disastrous results, including losing his powers and being fired by the Justice League. The Flash must find a way to restore time to its original path and finally apprehend his worst enemy before all is lost for The Flash … and the world! Along the route, The Flash encounters numerous new characters being introduced to the popular DC Super Heroes series, including The Atom; B’dg, a squirrel-esque Green Lantern; a pair of legendary super pets in Ace the Bat-Hound and Krypto the Super-Dog, Batman and Superman’s faithful canine pals; as well as Aquaman’s trusted seahorse, Storm.

A limited number of free tickets are still available to the general public, and families are encouraged to come enjoy the film and festivities. Fans wishing to receive free tickets to the Los Angeles event on February 10 must RSVP via email to LEGOFlashLA@gmail.com.

The body of all fan RSVP emails need ONLY include the (1) name of the entrant, (2) valid email address, and (3) the number of tickets being requested (limit four per entry). Fans should keep their entry simple – here’s an example of exactly how the body of the RSVP email should appear:

Barry Allen

2 tickets

BarryAllen@gmail.com

Tickets to the event will be distributed on a “first come, first served” basis, and fans will be notified via email and this will sell out so RSVP so ASAP for your family or just yourself! Please do not submit more than one request.

Other voices featured in the film are provided by actors Kate Micucci (Zatanna), Doctor Fate (Kevin Michael Richardson), Nolan North (Superman, Killer Croc), Dwight Schultz (Reverse-Flash), Tom Kenny (Plastic Man, The Penguin), Khary Payton (Cyborg), Vanessa Marshall (Poison Ivy), Dee Bradley Baker (Captain Boomerang, Aquaman) and Jason Spisak (The Joker).

 

Produced by Warner Bros. Animation, DC Entertainment and the LEGO Group, LEGO® DC Super Heroes: The Flash will be available from Warner Bros. Home Entertainment on Digital starting February 13. WBHE will distribute the film on March 13, 2016 on Blu-rayTM Combo Pack and DVD.

 

Leave a comment below if you plan to attend and make sure you say hi! If you have any questions you want me to ask on the red carpet tweet me @cherry_LA 

 

Posted in Animated, Comic Books Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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