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Category: music

April 1st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
Composer Mark Rivers shares his experience on Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

       I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Mark Rivers

Rivers is a writer, producer, and composer for television. He is best known for his work on Parks and Recreation, and Kroll Show, and most recently Netflix’s Big Mouth.

 

Q: Can you talk to me about your writing process on Big Mouth?

A: Sure! The process usually goes something like… there are a lot of songs in the show. Not a lot, but they’re enough.

Q: There’s a lot.

A: They’re enough. There’s plenty of songs. Usually, as they’re writing the script, the writers and the producers will hit upon a moment where they think, “You know, this moment could use a musical number,” and that’s when they give me a call… “Hey, episode 208, we got a song coming up for you. We want to talk about that.” So we’ll either get on the phone or we’ll meet at their offices and just talk through what they want this musical moment to be. The style of music… we’ve done everything from big band to disco to flamingo… so I never know what’s coming down the pike. My job is to take that moment and to understand the characters’ voices enough, and to understand the story and the script enough to write lyrics that service that moment. So, I’ll go away and shuffle around in my backyard, write a bunch of lyrics, come up with a song, send them a demo, and… cross my fingers that they like it. Usually, they’ll come back with a few notes here and there, and then I’ll run with it… produce it, get the cast members in to sing it. Turn it into something that works in the show. Beyond that, the scoring is very different. That comes much later, when there’s an animatic to score to. We’ll sit down together and we’ll go through like, “That could use some music right there! What about that?” and we’ll have some temporary library music in place. “I can do something better and bigger, that fits the moment better,” It’s back and forth like that. I’ll send them stuff, they’ll have notes, and then back and forth until we’re all happy with it.

Q: How much freedom are you allowed in that process? Do they let you do whatever you want?

BMI Composer Mark Rivers talks working on Netflix’s Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: Yeah, they trust me to run with it, and if they don’t like what I’ve done they’ll point out why… particularly lyrically. I’m really psyched that they’ve come to just trust me, lyrically. It’s always a bit difficult to inherit a bunch of lyrics… “Stick to these lyrics, don’t change anything…” It compromises the flow of a song. It’s just hard to write music that way. So they give me a lot of freedom… you know, once we’ve agreed upon a direction, the parameters that I should be working within. So yeah. Enough. I’m given enough freedom.

Q: Can I just say that Big Mouth is so, so funny, and I think that the music 

is the funniest part of it.

A: Oh cool! Really? Well, thanks. Thank you

Q: You did Parks & Rec, which is also so funny. I’m just a fan, I guess.

A: Oh good. I’m a fan of the show, too.

Q: What do you do in your free time?

A: I chase my kid around. I have an eight-year-old girl who’s not allowed to watch Big Mouth. I hang out with my wife and my kid.

Q: Do you listen to music? Or is it too much like work?

A: I try to. I have to make the effort to do it. My wife just bought me an Alexa, which immediately my daughter took over. Now she’s got someone to boss around. But I try to listen to more music. I don’t listen to as much as I used to… it’s hard to find stuff that’s like, “Wow, this is new and exciting!” like you did when you were a teenager and in your 20s. I find myself going back to stuff that I liked then… and I watch baseball and I drink beer, stuff like that. But that’s boring.

Q: So I’m really into choir music.

A: Yeah?

Q: Did you ever sing in a choir?

A: Did I ever sing in a choir? When I was a little kid. Well, in high school I sang in the Festival Chorale. I was a band nerd for a while, and then I joined the Festival Chorale because my friends were in it. They got to travel to Washington, D.C. every year and secretly party in the hotel rooms. That’s what I wanted to do.

Q: That’s what everyone wants to do when they go.

A: Yeah, yeah. It was more of the social aspect that drew me than the singing.

Q: Can I ask how you got into scoring, specifically T.V. shows?

A: Yeah… when I was a young man, I knew… I was playing in rock bands forever, but all my friends were comedians. I was living in Boston. I was friends with this whole budding Boston comedy scene. David Cross, who is a very old friend… and Marc Maron, and Louis C.K. and Jon Benjamin… these are all my friends and they liked my band and we would hang out. Years later when I moved to Boston, I had done Mr. Show with Bob and David– an old HBO sketch comedy show-I did that theme song… these guys were starting to get shows. My career as a rock musician had [raspberry sound effect, slams hand on table] grounded out. But these guys were taking off. I got into comedy writing, but also into writing music for these guys because they were old friends. They hired me because they knew me. I suppose they figured, “We can do worse than this guy.”

Q: Do you have a favorite composer?

A: I don’t. I don’t think I do. I mean… Beethoven? Have you heard of Beethoven?

Q: No. Who?

A: I don’t think I do. I have my favorite pop musicians. I was a huge Elvis Costello, XTC fan. That’s what most excited me when I was starting to write rock songs, pop songs. Bowie and The Beatles… other people, too. But I mean, that was sort of the foundation of all the stuff I liked. As far as T.V. composers there are people I like. I’ll hear music on other shows and think, “Oh, that guy’s pretty good! That Dave Porter guy is pretty good!” There’s a guy that does music on a kids show called Masha and the Bear, he writes these great little weird, off-kilter pop songs. They’re really good. Occasionally something will grab my ear, but I wouldn’t say… I’m too old to be a fan of anybody anymore.

Q: Do you read any comics?

A: I don’t. I don’t. The last comic I read… I liked Eightball. I was an Eightball fan. Dan Clowes… I know there are other people sort of like him and in the graphic novel world… I never kept up with it. I have a kid now…

Q: She doesn’t like comics?

A: Not yet! Maybe she’ll get into them. She likes reading. She likes books. She likes Judy Blume.

Q: I loved Judy Blume.

A: She was gonna read Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret and we were like, “No no no no no, not yet!” She’s eight.

Posted in Animated, Comedy, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , , , , ,

March 31st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
(L to R): Composers and panelists Mark Rivers, Tim Kiefer, Ryan Elder, and Tom Howe at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Tom Howe

Howe is an award-winning film and television composer and is most known for his work on Wonder Woman and Legend of Tarzan. He has recently worked on the new animated film Early Man.

 

Q: How’s your Wondercon going? Did you just get here?

A: I just got here, and it’s great. I didn’t realize it was such a big thing. Seeing everyone walking around in their costumes was fantastic. I think Americans do things bigger and better than anywhere else.

Q: Are you from England?

A: I am.

Q: I didn’t know that.

A: Yeah. I’m from there. Lived here four years, though.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about Early Man?

A: Yeah. I came on to that project 10 weeks from when we recorded which was November. My co-writer, who is Harry Gregson-Williams, he called me and asked me if I’d like to co-write the movie with him, and I then flew over to London to meet Nick Park and the team. Hung out there for a couple of days just getting to know everybody, visiting sets, and came back and then we started writing, trying to get things approved because we didn’t have a lot of time before we actually had to record. But the movie was fairly complete by that point. Some things change but a lot of the animation had been done because it takes like four or five years for them to get it together, because it’s very slow. It’s frame by frame filmmaking. It was just a great opportunity to be a part of and a fantastic process.

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

A: My parents are both musical, and…my dad plays the organ, piano, guitar, and things, but he played the organ in church and my mom sung in the choir, so I did a lot of singing when I was younger. I started piano at about four or five or something. I took up the guitar at eight, I think, and then the clarinet later, a few things like that. I studied music and orchestration and things later on. I thought originally I was going to be in a band and be a songwriter. That’s what I really wanted to do, but I got a lot of people asking me to do string arrangements for songs, so I ended up going more in that direction. Somebody who I’d been in college with, who had nothing to do with music, but she got a job at a television channel. She called me they needed some music for a very small thing

Composer of Early Man, Tom Howe talks animation at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

they were doing. A two minute long student film that they were putting out that day, and I did that. I’d suddenly found that I’d switched directions from what I thought I was gonna do to writing music for media. After that, that producer went on to do something else and I worked with him, then. One thing sort of snowballed to the other. I always knew I was going to do music, whether it was songwriting or film work or whatever.

 

Q: What music do you listen to in your free time?

A: Uhm….

Q: If you like to listen to music in your free time.

A: Funnily enough, because you’re on a film or T.V. show and you’re writing music it can be 18 hours a day for six-and-a-half days a week, sometimes seven when you’re getting near the end. There isn’t really a lot of time to listen to music outside of that, and I almost don’t want to. So I actually I find I listen to a lot of talk radio because I want to hear something but I need it to be almost like white noise that just distracts me rather than something musical. But if I get the chance… I’ve got three kids who listen to all kinds of different things. Usually, it will be whatever they’re listening to, because if we’re driving somewhere in the car, that will take priority over whatever I want to listen to.

Q: You talked a little bit about being in choirs?

A: Yeah.

Q: I love choir. Do you have a favorite choir composer?

A: Yeah, I love Morten Lauridsen, who I think is amazing. He and actually Eric Whitacre is another guy. Eric Whitacre is quite similar to Morten Lauridsen, but there’s a piece called “O Magnum Mysterium” by Lauridsen and I think it’s fantastic. The really close kind of voice writing. A lot of divisi cuts and clashes but… I don’t think there’s anything like the voice… strings get pretty close maybe, but I think that there’s nothing like just voices for everything, really. For emotion, for written things… one of the films I remember seeing growing up was a film called Cry Freedom. This sort of fantastic African choir, just the sound of it obliterated everything else in the movie in terms of the musical stuff. I thought they were amazing. But those are probably the two that I’ve been listening to, recently anyway. I think they’re both great.

Q: I sang that piece in high school.

A: Really?

Q: I loved it. It was beautiful.

A: It’s great, isn’t it?

Q: It was a lot of work.

A: I was gonna say, it’s not an easy thing to sing. There’s a lot or very close writing that then resolves, isn’t it? You’re clashing for quite a bit. But yeah, it’s a great piece of music.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about your role in the Wonder Woman movie?

A: Sure, yes. I was an additional composer on that movie for Rupert Gregson-Williams. That really involves… well, on a movie like that there was, again not a lot of time to put it together, but also there’s a lot of minutes of music. So, I’ll take on some scenes, basically, on Rupert’s behalf and I’ll either take a theme that he’s written-obviously all the main themes are by him and he’s doing the bulk of the movie- and I’ll work that theme into the scene that I’m doing. Or it could be a stand-alone scene that therefore isn’t hugely affecting the arc, then I’ll take that on just to kind of mean that he has not got to do it. So I probably took eight or nine, ten scenes in the movie, something like that. Just try to help out, really. It’s not uncommon on some of these big movies to have one or two other people kind of running alongside you trying to get it all done. Particularly when on a movie of that scale, where the picture’s changing a lot, so there’s a lot of musical conforms to do as well as writing. You’re permanently trying to keep up with the latest version of the picture. It’s just a lot of work that needs to be done. I’ve done that on several different movies for different people, but it’s a great thing to do, I think because you get the experience of working on a huge movie-you’re part of it, your music’s going into the film-but you slightly can stand back from the pressure of being in the firing line as the lead composer if they don’t like it at all. You can learn a lot doing it. It’s good fun. The movie turned out well didn’t it? It was huge. It was very successful.

Q: I loved that movie.

A: Second one’s coming.

Q: Do you read comics at all?

A: I haven’t for many years. A friend of mine collects the original ones and he seems to have an amazing collection of very valuable comics, as well. Do you collect them?

Q: I don’t collect them because I’ve seen that it’s not valuable. But it’s cool to read, I guess. If I really like a piece then I’ll buy it. How much freedom do get when you’re composing?

A: It depends on the project actually. Fairly- initially, anyway- a fairly big degree of flexibility in what you can do and theme ideas, and things. But, fundamentally, writing film music you’re always serving the filmmakers vision, the studio, the other people involved. So you have to respect that. I think sometimes, in the case of like Early Man. I was on for ten weeks, Nick Park was on for six years, so he’s going to have a better idea of what it is and what he wants than I am. I can’t absorb that in that short amount of time, and I have to start writing straight away. I’ve only got ten days before I’m trying to be at the same speed. I think you do get freedom, but at the same time people know what they want and you are trying to serve a higher purpose. Otherwise, you can go write concert music.

 

Follow Tom Howe on Twitter: @howe_tom

Posted in Animated, art, Comic Books, Comic Con, Film, geek tv, Movie, music, TV Tagged with: , , , ,

March 30th, 2018 by Aiyonna White

By Aiyonna White, Contributor

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Ryan Elder

Elder is a television and film composer best known for his work on Rick and Morty. He has also composed music for The Wizards of Waverly Place and the upcoming Boss Baby television series.

 

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: When I was a kid my family was very musical. I took violin lessons when I was five and my dad had a little recording studio in our home, and he would help me write songs and produce them. I would write boyband songs when I was seven. So I’ve always been in music then in college I got a degree in composition, and after college, I had an opportunity to do an internship at a company that did music for commercials. I started working with them and I did commercial music for about 11 years and then during that time I became friends with the creators of Rick and Morty and they brought me on when it was time to do the show.

Q: How much freedom do you get in composing music or picking which songs go into an episode?

A: For picking the songs, I’m not involved in that, generally. That’s some other people. Showrunners or producers pick the songs. For the original music that I write, I actually get a ton of freedom. Basically, they send me the cuts with no music and I just do whatever I want. I get a lot of freedom. They generally like what I do and don’t have a ton of notes for me. What you hear is my idea. It’s pretty sweet. I’m pretty lucky.  

Q: You have some great songs. My friends and I sang “Get Schwifty” for at least a year after we saw the episode.

A: [laughter]

Q: In the video you did with “Great Big Story” you talked about musical easter eggs. Can you tell me another one?

A: [laughter] I think when we filmed that episode seven of season three wasn’t out yet… it’s hard to explain. They’re not so point-outable as the “Jerry Daycare” one I mentioned in that video. In episode seven, I think it’s called “The Ricklantis Mixup,” I created a whole new sound of music for that episode. So there’s a lot of callbacks to the same sort of thematic material in that episode which I don’t always do. I barely ever use the theme song as a part of the score, just a couple of times. One time when Pickle Rick jumps out of the toilet, and stuff like that… so… yeah. Sorry, it’s not the most satisfying answer.

Q: That’s okay. Can you tell me about the process that you go through when you’re composing a piece?

A: I try to be as informed by the story that’s being told as much as possible. For me, the most important thing is helping to tell the story. The first thing I usually do is watch the episode and figure out, “Okay, do I have any questions about what’s happening here- questions about character motivations-is the audience supposed to feel tense in this scene or are the characters tense and we’re not?” For me, the first step is just nailing down, “What moods do I need to hit here to tell the story the way that Justin and Dan, the creators, want?” Then, after that, it’s like…  as with any composer we all have like a bag of tricks that we pull from. And I could get really inside baseball and tell you like “Oh, I use the tremolo strings when I need this and blah blah blah,” but the basic thing is, I have the sounds that I go to for different moods and it’s all dependent on the mood or the story that needs to be told.

Q: Are some things easier to score than others?

A: Absolutely. There’s definitely scenes where the music is very much taking a backseat and in those scenes, it’s a lot of just pressing one note on the keyboard for a long time. Those are easy, right? Some are like very much more challenging, like writing the songs. “Goodbye Moonmen,” that was like a process. It didn’t take me very long once I started writing the music but I needed to prepare by listening to a bunch of David Bowie and figuring out how those lyrics were gonna work… y’know… it just depends.

Q: Just really quick, did you do “Get Schwifty”? Was that you?

A: I did not. I’ll talk about it in the panel, actually.

Q: I’m so sorry.

A: No, that’s okay. Because… this is one of the questions from the panel, actually, but those songs were done for a really small flash game that Adult Swim released. It was a mobile game or something. Morty finds Summer’s iPod in that game, and on the iPod, there’re three songs, and they all are featured in Season 2. “Get Schwifty” and “Head Bent Over” are two of them. Justin just improvised those lyrics over some stock music. When it came time to do the episode of “Get Schwifty” all the writers loved those songs so much from the game they said, “Let’s do a whole episode based around these songs,” At that point, it was like,  “Let’s not reinvent the wheel. These songs are funny. Let’s keep the music as is.” I wasn’t really involved with them. I mean, I kinda mixed and mastered to make them sound good for T.V.  but for the most part, it was just Justin improvising lyrics over these stock music.

BMI Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

 

Q: What do you like to listen to in your free time?

A: I like a lot of moody… [laughter] I listen to sad music. My wife always gives me shit about it but right now I’m into Sufjan Stevens

 

Q: I love him!

A: Yeah, Carrie & Lowell, I think is like one of the best records of all time.

 

Q: When he sang at the Oscars I was just [grabs chest dramatically].

A: Ugh. So good. And then, I’m into this band Tennis, if you know Tennis. One of the reasons I got into them is because they invited me to their show. They’re big fans of Rick and Morty, so it’s like, “Oh, I’ll become fans of you guys then,”…y’know, I tend to listen to… if I’m going to listen to new stuff it’s a lot of stuff that my friends and people I know are working on. That’s the short answer.

Q: So, I’m really into choir.

A: Okay.

Q: Just out of curiosity, have you ever sung in a choir?

A: I was in my high school choir and then in college, I was in an acapella group. The Macalester Traditions, I’ll shout them out. It was fun. [laughter] I learned a lot about-because I would do arrangements for them, in addition to singing- I would arrange a lot of the songs that we sang. So I learned a lot of stuff doing that, that I use on a regular basis. All the background vocals on “Goodbye Moonmen” are stuff that I would have done in the acapella group for sure. I want to hear an acapella group do “Goodbye Moonmen,” I hope there’s one out there that wants to try it.

Q: Do you have a favorite composer right now?

A: My all time favorite film composer is Jerry Goldsmith. I’m super influenced by him a lot. I mean, he was a master, and just incredible. He did some of my favorite movies, and certainly some of my favorite scores, like “The Planet of the Apes” score. It’s just mind-blowing. Whenever I get stuck on Rick and Morty, i’ll just put on the “Alien” score or something and try to be inspired by that. He’s definitely up there.

Q: What other music do you listen to?

A: I’ll just list off things. We just got Spotify, so I’ve been re-exploring stuff from when I was in high school and I’m old, so it’s all 90’s alternative stuff. I’m also way into… went way down the rabbit hole into “New Jack Swing” which is a style of music that was only around for like, five years in the late 80’s early 90’s. It was really specific. Bobby Brown, Ronnie DeVoe, these bands that did this really specific style of music. I got way into that and just started listening to every song I could find of that. As far as new stuff, I really like Miike Snow, if you know that group… Haim. I like pop music that is not radio pop music, but it’s pop-y. Things with good hooks, good melodies, that’s what I look for in what I listen to for fun. It’s hard as a composer, I will say, and I bet these other guys here with me today will say the same thing. When your hobby becomes your job, then your job is your hobby. You don’t really want to listen to more music on your time off. So I listen to a lot of comedy podcasts and stuff like that.

Q: Which ones?

A: I’m a huge “Comedy Bang! Bang!” Fan. My friend’s podcast “Beyond Yacht Rock Podcast” is really good. They come up with a new genre of music every week. It’s really fun. Any of the Earwolf stuff, the Comedy Bang! Bang! Spin-offs. I listen to my bosses podcast “Harmontown”, fairly regularly to see what’s going on with him. I shouldn’t tell him I listen to that. [laughter] I’ve been getting into the true crime podcasts like everyone else.

Q: Do you read comics?

A: When I was a kid I collected them. In the 90’s there was this huge boom when Image and Valiant were new publishers and everyone wanted them. I collected them because I thought they were gonna worth something. I read them, too- which I know is not a good combo. Reading them, and thinking they’re going to be worth something don’t really go well together. But, I haven’t read comics much lately. But I like comics, actually. I have so many hobbies. I play Magic: The Gathering all the time. I just have too many hobbies. Can’t make time for everything.

 

Follow Ryan Elder on Twitter: @RyanElderMusic

Posted in Animated, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , ,

January 12th, 2018 by Cherry

I remember seeing the original Disney’s Aladdin (animated film) in 1992 with my family. It was a delight that had my entire family laughing from my little brother who was in pre-school to my parents. It’s always been a favorite because of the warm fuzzy feelings it gives me so had extremely high expectations when the Broadway show came to the Pantages. We’ve all seen the video of the Broadway cast ‘sing-off’ at the airport with the Lion King cast. The Disneyfication of Broadway has given me hours of joy watching beloved animated series and none have been a disappointment. From the puppetry of The Lion King and delighted by the Beauty and the Beast costumes … Disney musicals are pure magic. 

I adored the show it’s a scrumptious visual light pastry that is full of layers to delight attendees of all ages. The moment the curtain opened I was intrigued with the beautiful Aladdin and Jasmine whose voices twirled and danced in my ear like dervishes. The Genie had huge feet to fill but he was able to channel the comic genius of Robin Williams and make it his own. I loved how they were able to translate the animation to real life. We all remember the saucy sarcastic parrot constantly whispering in the Sultans ear. Going into the show I thought they might use a toy bird with a recorder but to have a ‘mini me’ with all the spunk and trouble played by Reggie De Leon (Iago) was hilarious from the evil laugh to plotting with the Sultan to take over the kingdom. I was giggling like a schoolgirl. The costumes were BEAUTIFUL and truly enriched the visuals of the show adding texture and placing them in the Arabian nights fantasy of this Disney fairytale. The costumes didn’t just add texture but also content that reminded me of some of my favorite scenes from the animated films but still allowing the cast to dance and sing. The set designer out did themselves with the market and the cave of treasure. I don’t want to give away too much but don’t take your eyes away from one moment. Try to study the depth and how design enriched the playto transport youto another world. Watching Aladdin made me feel as if I was on the stage with the movement, brightness and cast interactions with the set. It felt ‘real’ and people around me ‘oohed and aahed’ so many times with me. I mean the man to the right gasped with me when the flying carpet took off. When people say ‘Disney magic’ they are talking about this musical that looked so much like a live action of the animated movie that I plan to watch the film again!

Perfect show to see with BFF

 

The story of boy meets girl and boy finds a genie is the classic romcom I needed to have my feet tapping with beloved songs from the Disney library and new music. My gosh the flying carpet was a marvel and had me so lost in the moment I felt it was magic (since I have NO idea how they did it) but I have never wanted to fly above the city in arms of a good-hearted thief more! I truly recommend going to see Aladdin with your BFF, the person who stole your heart and of course anyone who’s a kid or a kid at heart. Aladdin will show you the world and leave you delighted.

Aladdin opened on Broadway in 2014 with homage to the animated film and fairy tale but with a Walt Disney stamp to appeal to fans of all ages. It was with joy and anticipation to learn that it would make its first appearance in January so was delighted to be able to attend the first show. I wasn’t the only one since the filled Pantages had fans young and old ready to rub a lamp and have Adam Jacobs the Broadway actor who originated the role appear to grant THREE wishes. In addition to Adam Jacobs, Reggie De Leon reprises his role as Iago from the Broadway show.

Aladdin, Hollywood Pantages Theatre, 6233 Hollywood Blvd., Hollywood; Jan. 10-March 31; $35-$205. hollywoodpantages.com.

 

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December 29th, 2016 by Cherry

Black Panther writer Ta-Nehisi Coates blend of hip-hop, commentary and animated comics is the re-introduction of an iconic character. The monthly animated comic series which enriches the story Ta-Nehisi is writing has a new track by Kipp stone called ‘100 Black Panthers’.

 

MARVEL COMICS PROUDLY PRESENTS
“BLACK PANTHER: A NATION UNDER OUR FEET – PART EIGHT”
FEATURING THE WORLD DEBUT OF
“100 BLACK PANTHERS” BY KIPP STONE

 

 

 

“It feels really good having the opportunity to work Marvel,” said Stone.  “I have always rocked with Marvel characters when it comes to superheroes, so doing a song that reps Black Panther wasn’t that hard. He stands for what I stand for, solidarity, strength and loyalty.” 

 

Innovative Marvel Video Series Bridges Marvel Comics with Top Music Talent that has stories propelling the mythology of the African hero. Will Ramonda, his surrogate mother recover from the bomb injuries or will her broken body succumb? His sister Shuri has returned from Djalia but is she still herself or something more? A legend or a danger to Black Panther and his people? Marvel’s hero T’Challa, the Black Panther is an exciting series that will keep new and old fans excited and hungry for more after the introduction in the last Avengers film. This series play homage to the classic series I’d read as a kid but with a modern sensibility that shows a an independent African nation with a hero that will defend his people. It’s especially exciting that Marvel has reached out to artists to create original music tied to the video comic book that fans can watch on youtube. I especially like when the artists discuss how the feel about the character and how it fed into the creative process. The image of the Black Panther is so important to many fans of the genre and the Marvel universe is enriched because of the contribution of the writer, artists and musicians. I hope the fans love T’Challa and that the popularity of this series is a catalyst of more comic books and video series representing new diverse characters.

Black Panther #9 is available digitally through the Marvel Digital Comic Shop and at all local comic book retailers. To find a comic shop near you, visit www.comicshoplocator.com or call 1-888-comicbook.

Posted in Animated, art, Comic Books, music Tagged with: , , , , , , ,

October 22nd, 2016 by Cherry

Celebrate Halloween with Bruce Campbell at the ACE Hotel and the world premiere of the Evil Dead in Concern/Live to Film: A Halloween Theatrical Experience

 

Evil Dead in Concert / Live to FilmWho doesn’t love the Evil Dead??? The Evil Dead is a beloved cult favorite that has lived on with video games, comic books and the new series on STARZ and counts among the fans are horror author Stephen King. The show will take place at the gothic 1920’s movie palace The Theatre at Ace Hotel that will be transformed fit for the horror comedy classic. LA Wild Up Chamber Orchestra will perform Sam Raimi’s classic horror film score LIVE for the film! Joseph LoDuca who was the original film’s composer is a featured artist who’s worked to take score from film to life for one special night.The show will open with Harry Potter’s Luna Lovegood, Evanna Lynch, and violinist Lili Haydn, performing the World Premiere of Joseph LoDuca’s The Tell-Tale Heart: A Duet In Terror based on Edgar Allan Poe’s horror classic all together they will be the Greek Chorus for the evening.

I have high hopes for this special evening that’s co-directed by the Award-winning Jaime Robledo and Richard Kraft who recently were the creative directors on the highly acclaimed Disney’s The Little Mermaid In Concert at The Hollywood Bowl starring Sara Bareilles and Rebel Wilson. The show is being produced by Wordless Music, Laura Engel & Richard Kraft, Spaceland and Allison Abbate.
Tickets are available over at: http://www.acehotel.com/calendar/losangeles/evil-dead-concert-live-film
Image result for the evil dead
BRUCE CAMPBELL (Host) img_0861
In 1979 with his Detroit friends, Sam Raimi and Rob Tapert, Campbell raised $350,000 for a low-budget filmEvil Dead, in which he starred and co-executive produced. Completed piecemeal over four years, the film first gained notoriety in England where it became the best-selling video of 1983, beating out The Shining. After its appearance at Cannes, where Stephen King dubbed it “the most ferociously original horror filmof the year,” New Line Cinema stepped forward to release Evil Dead in the U.S. Campbell then rejoined his Detroit colleagues to star and co-produce the second and third films in the Evil Dead trilogy, completing 12 years of work on the cult favorite.

 

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 SAM RAIMI (Film Director)
Sam Raimi is an American film director, producer, screenwriter and actor, in particular recognized for creating the cult horror The Evil Dead series, as well as directing the original Spider-Man trilogy and the superhero film Darkman. His most recent work as a director includes 2013’s Disney fantasy film Oz the Great and Powerful. Recently, Raimi produced The Possession, and the latest remake of The Evil Dead. He is currently working on a film adaption of the critically acclaimed video game The Last of Us.
JOSEPH LODUCA (Composer & Guest Artist)
Two-time Emmy Award winning composer Joseph LoDuca is best known for his work writing television scores for series including Spartacus: Blood and SandLeverageHercules: The Legendary Journeys, and Xena: Warrior Princess. He also scored films who won international recognition such as director Sam Raimi’s Evil Dead TrilogyBrotherhood of the Wolf – César nominee for Best Score –,Saint Ange and Patagonia – which was chosen as the 2012 British entry for the Foreign Language Oscar. His varied career also features operettas, musicals, songwriting collaborations with pop artist Duffy and operatic baritone Bryn Terfel, as well as theme songs, which have earned him five of his twelve Emmy nominations.
EVANNA LYNCH (Narrator)
EVANNA LYNCH currently stars as the title character in MY NAME IS EMILY, the Simon Fitzmaurice directed independent film for which she received an IFTA Nomination for Best Actress in a Leading Role.  Her other recent film work includes the co-lead of the independent feature Dynamite opposite Ian Harding as well as the hit festival movie GBF opposite Megan Mullally, Rebecca Gayheart and Sasha Pieterse. Lynch was born in Ireland and grew up reading the Harry Potter books and studying drama at the Centre for the Talented Youth of Ireland. After attending an open casting call in London for HARRY POTTER AND THE ORDER OF THE PHOENIX, Lynch was cast in the role of Luna Lovegood. Lynch portrayed Luna Lovegood in all of the subsequent Harry Potter films, earning her praise amongst critics and fans.
LILI HAYDN (Violin Soloist)
Lili Haydn has released four critically acclaimed recordings as a solo artist.  Lili (Atlantic Records), Light Blue Sun (BMG Music), Place Between Places (Nettwerk Music Group), which was a favorite on NPR, praising it as “A mix of neo-psychedelic flower child and rock star virtuoso…Heifetz meet Hendrix,”  and LiliLand, released in late 2014, with its single, Sea of Gold reaching commercial radio success. LiliLand was written in the aftermath of a freak chemical accident resulting in the loss of everything Lili owned.  Lili describes this record as “the jungle of my mind.  Fun, fragile, and ferocious songs about losing everything and getting it back”
WILD UP (Chamber Orchestra)
wild Up is an experimental classical ensemble. A flexible band of Los Angeles musicians committed to creating visceral, thought-provoking happenings. The group, led by artistic director and conductor Christopher Rountree, unites around the belief that no music is off limits, and that a concert space should be as moving as the music heard in it: small, powerful and unlike anything else. Their projects are meant to bring people together, defy convention and address the need for heart-wrenching, mind-bending experiences.
JAIME ROBLEDO (Show Co-Director)
Based in LA, Jaime recently wrote and directed live shows for the grand opening of Shanghai Disneyland earlier this spring. Member of Sacred Fools Theater Company. Credits there include: Astro Boy and the God of Comics (Ovation, LADCC, Stage Raw award winner), 2013 LA Weekly Production of the Year, Stoneface (starring French Stewart), which transferred to the Pasadena Playhouse, and Watson (LA Weekly Award Winner; Comedy Direction). Other Credits: World Premieres of Adam Szymkowicz’s Hearts Like Fists and Bill Robens’ Rio Hondo (Theatre of NOTE). You can also see his work as part of the theatrically immersive Halloween hit Wicked Lit running now. For more information visit: www.jrobledo.com Thank you Richard for bringing me along for this ride.
RICHARD KRAFT (Show Co-Director)
Richard Kraft was a producer of Disney’s The Nightmare Before Christmas Live at the Hollywood Bowl and the PBS special Live at Lincoln Center: Danny Elfman’s Music From the Films of Tim Burton. Kraft also was the creative director and producer of the highly acclaimed Disney’s The Little Mermaid In Concert at The Hollywood Bowl. He was an Executive Producer of the Grammy nominated Danny Elfman and Tim Burton 25th Anniversary Music Box. Richard Kraft started his career representing his musical heroes including Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein, George Delerue, John Barry, and Henry Mancini.
WORDLESS MUSIC (Producer)
Wordless Music Orchestra is the house band of New York City’s Wordless Music series, which was founded by non-musician Ronen Givony in 2006 and has since presented concerts in museums, churches, nightclubs, and out of doors, pairing artists from the sound worlds of so-called classical, electronic, and rock music. Comprising New York’s most omnivorous young musicians, and members of groups such as Alarm Will Sound, ACME, and Ensemble Signal, the orchestra presented its first concerts over two sold-out nights in January 2008 under conductor Brad Lubman, with the U.S. premiere of Jonny Greenwood’s Popcorn Superhet Receiver, on a program with music of Gavin Bryars and John Adams.
LAURA ENGEL & RICHARD KRAFT (Producers)
Richard Kraft and Laura Engel are the co-owners of Kraft-Engel Management, one of the world’s leading agencies specializing in representing film and theater composers including a number of Oscar, Tony, Emmy, and Grammy winners. Kraft and Engel executive produced the Danny Elfman and Tim Burton 25th Anniversary Music Box which was nominated for a Grammy Award. Richard Kraft started his career representing his musical heroes including Jerry Goldsmith, Elmer Bernstein, George Delerue, John Barry, and Henry Mancini. Laura Engel started her career working with Danny Elfman and Oingo Boingo, first as tour manager and later as manager. In 2011, she was honored by Variety as one of the year’s 50 Most Impactful Women in Showbiz. Engel was previously nominated for a Grammy Award for producing the long form concert video: Oingo Boingo Farewell: Live From the Universal Amphitheater. Together they have produced Disney’s The Nightmare Before Christmas Live at the Hollywood Bowl, the PBS special Live at Lincoln Center: Danny Elfman’s Music From the Films of Tim Burton and Disney’s The Little Mermaid In Concert at The Hollywood Bowl.
SPACELAND (Producer)
Spaceland Presents puts on concerts and shows at various venues in Los Angeles including The Autry in Griffith Park, Natural History Museum, Getty Museum + More!
ALLISON ABBATE (Producer)
Allison Abbate, the BAFTA-Award winning producer of The Iron Giant, has made her mark in producing and working on some of the most influential, gothic animated films of the past two decades. She started her career working on the cult classic The Nightmare Before Christmas, which fostered a long time collaboration with Tim Burton, leading her to produce both Frankenweenie, and The Corpse Bride. In addition to these beloved features, she produced the Oscar nominated film Fantastic Mr. Fox, and served as Executive Producer of Warner Bros’ box office hit The Lego Movie.
JENNY ASHMAN (Singer)
Originally from Alaska, Jenny was last seen as Eva Peron in Opera North’s production of Evita and Arista in Disney’s The Little Mermaid at the Hollywood Bowl. Off-Broadway & Regional: Sleep No More, Johanna in Sweeney Todd (Ovation Award Nom), Rosalind in As You Like It, Penny in Romance Language (World Premiere), Meg in Little Women and Rhoda in A New Brain. Upcoming: Bea Stein in J.D. Salinger biopic, Rebel in the Rye (directed by Empire creator Danny Strong)Jenny is a graduate of UCF Conservatory Theatre. www.jennyashman.com
JEFFERY HOEPPNER (Jazz Music Arranger)
Jeffrey Hoeppner is an American pop music producer, film/television composer, and vocalist. In a career spanning just over 15 years, Hoeppner has written and produced for several artists including Marques Houston, Omarion, Tevin Campbell, Sugababes, Zendaya & Bella Thorne (Shake It Up), Ross Lynch & Lauren Murano (Austin & Ally), Dove Cameron (Liv & Maddie), Jeff Timmons (98º), F(x), Shinee, EXO, and Darren Chriss. Hoeppner has recently arranged music for “The Little Mermaid” at the Hollywood Bowl. He has also received Gold and Platinum records for his work, worldwide. He currently lives in Los Angeles, CA.
EVIL DEAD
The cult classic follows a group of college students vacationing in an isolated cabin in Tennessee, where they find an unspeakable evil lurking in the forest. The group unknowingly releases flesh-possessing demons and spirits leading to brutal chaos.
ACE HOTEL DOWNTOWN LOS ANGELES
Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles makes its home in the historic United Artists building in Downtown LA. Built in 1927 for the maverick filmstudio, the ornate theatre and the 14-story Spanish Gothic office tower that fronts it have been lovingly retrofitted into a modern hotel — enlivening the building’s historical soul with the meticulous attention to detail that Ace is known for and standing as a spiritual anchor at the heart of the Broadway Theater District’s vibrant modern renaissance. View upcoming events at The Theatre at Ace Hotel DTLA at www.acehotel.com/theatre, and follow along on Twitter (@theatre_acedtla), Instagram and Facebook.

Posted in concert, Film, Geek Fun, geek tv, Los Angeles, music, Theatre Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

August 14th, 2016 by Cherry
GIVE BACK AND ENJOY GREAT MUSIC AND FOOD WITH CHEF BRUCE KALMAN AND MARIE PETULLA OF KNEAD & CO. 
JOIN FORCES WITH GREEN WISH 
TO SUPPORT FIVE LOCAL GREEN CHARITIES AT
FOOD AND MUSIC FEST IN DOWNTOWN LA 
AT GRAND CENTRAL MARKET
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Please join Celebrity Chef Bruce Kalman and Marie Petulla of KP Hospitality Group, Green Wish Founder actor Raphael Sbarge (TNT’s Murder in the First, ABC’s Once Upon a Time), and Green Wish President Scott Harris, COO Building Construction Group, and Green Wish Board Members Sharon Lawrence and Ed Begley, Jr. along with celebrity attendees including: Camille Balsamo (Murder in the First, Harbinger Down) & Reid Collums (Harbinger Down, GREEK), Currie Graham (Murder In The First), Lee Arenberg (Pirates of the Caribbean, Once Upon A Time), Lombardo Boyar (Murder in the First), Jamie McShane (Bloodlines, Murder In the First), Bill Pullman (Independence Day), Nicholas Guest ( Madam Secretary, Sleepy Hollow) & Pamela Guest (Cleopatra Backstage), KJ Smith (Queen Sugar, Family Time),  James Anderson (NFL Player New Orleans Saints), International Model Carissa Rosario and Saga Elmotaseb (Spice It Up With Saga), among others at KNEAD to Give Food & Music Fest – Powered by Green Wish. With LIVE entertainmentby Winslet andChef Bruce Kalman’s band, Foie Grock and food by Knead & Co. Pasta Bar + Market, Ramen Hood, DTLA Cheese, Bar Moruno, Valerie Confections and Coolhaus.

BUY TICKETS

 

Green Wish and Knead & Co. Pasta Bar + Market are teaming up for The KNEAD to Give Food & Music Fest – Powered by Green Wish, a food and music charity event which is a fusion of great food, live entertainment and passionate people who will come together to keep LA Green to support five local Los Angeles charities: Food ForwardHoneyLoveMuir Ranch PasadenaHollywood Orchard, and FoLAR.

 

KNEAD & CO. pasta bar + market @ Grand Central Market

317 S. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90013
Food Forward-Food Forward rescues fresh local produce that would otherwise go to waste, connecting this abundance with people in need, and inspiring others to do the same.
HoneyLove – HoneyLove is a Los Angeles based non-profit conservation organization with a mission to protect the honeybees by educating our communities and inspiring new urban beekeepers.
Muir Ranch Pasadena – In 2011, a dedicated team of volunteer teachers and students began converting 1.5 acres of the John Muir High School campus into an urban farm. Muir Ranch grows a variety of flowers, vegetables and fruit that are included in weekly CSA boxes as well as school cafeteria lunches. Students can complete community service or internship graduation requirements by enrolling in classes at the Ranch. Muir Ranch also provides paid internships to students, which are funded by private donations, special events, farmer’s market sales, and subscriptions to the produce box program (CSA).
Hollywood Orchard– To better neighborhood quality of life by operating a community orchard that is a teaching model for sustainability through its workshops on growing fruit locally, and sharing the food in open-air events held in the Beachwood Canyon community, outreach communities, and food-charity organizations.
FoLAR Is a non-profit organization founded in 1986, whose mission is to protect and restore the natural and historic heritage of the Los Angeles River and its riparian habitat through inclusive planning, education and wise stewardship. Once home to steelhead and grizzlies, the Los Angeles River meandered through wetlands, marshes, willow, alder and sycamore, providing desperately needed water for the region. Now running over 50 miles long – from the suburbs of the San Fernando Valley to the ocean in Long Beach – the Los Angeles River flows through 14 cities and countless neighborhoods. When the Army Corps of Engineers initiated a flood control project in the late 1930s, they began the process of paving 80% of the River, creating the world’s largest storm drain. Over the ensuing decades, the River that had been the sole water supply for the City of Los Angeles before the Los Angeles Aqueduct was completed in 1913 almost disappeared from public consciousness. With the cement came a perceptual shift: the River no longer existed. Instead, it was a “flood control channel,” a no-man’s land, surrounded by fences and signs.
Green Wish – is a grassroots, non-profit organization that funds local, green organizations through customers’ small donations at local retailers. Put simply: We’re a charity that helps fund the green projects in your neighborhood!
Green Wish was founded in 2009 by actor/producer Raphael Sbarge, after the birth of his first child, “I was struck by how alive I suddenly felt as a father,” he explained. “Conversely, I also felt remarkably vulnerable and defenseless to protect this little person’s journey in a world as vast and complex as ours. I had to ask, ‘What can we do to contribute in any small way to leave the world a better place than when we found it?'”
The answer: Green Wish – we help people to support a movement – not just one organization, but multiple ones. When you donate to Green Wish, you’re actually helping numerous environmental groups, right in your own community.
Green Wish partners with local retailers, which place our donation cards right at their cash registers. Customers can “buy” and add Green Wish donations on to their purchase at the retailer.
These donations are collected by local Green Wish chapters and distributed regularly to area organizations that have been carefully vetted. The board of directors in each chapter evaluates and selects deserving organizations with track records of good work across the green spectrum, focusing on air, water, earth and environmental education. * Ninety cents of every dollar* goes to your local green groups.
We started in Los Angeles with a chapter supporting nine organizations in Southern California. We are spreading across the country with the ultimate goal to start Green Wish chapters across the country, all supporting groups in their communities.

 

Posted in festival, Good Cause, Los Angeles, music Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

July 17th, 2016 by Cherry
See CABARET for just $39 (Reg. $85 & $65) Tues – Fri Evenings at 8pm and Sundays at 6:30pm
Direct from Broadway, CABARET reunites director Sam Mendes, co-director / choreographer Rob Marshall and many of the same creative team members behind the Tony-Winning 1998 revival production. The New York Times calls it, “Divinely, dangerously decadent,” while Time Out New York hails it “A Broadway jewel in all its glittering glory!”

CABARET tells the story of the infamous Kit Kat Klub, where the Emcee, Sally Bowles and a raucous ensemble take the stage nightly to tantalize the crowd–and to leave their troubles outside. But as life in pre-WWII Germany grows more and more uncertain, the question remains as to whether or not the decadent allure of Berlin nightlife will be enough to get them through their dangerous times. CABARET features some of the most memorable songs in theatre history, including “Cabaret,” “Willkommen” and “Maybe This Time.”

 Roundabout Theatre Company and the Nederlander Organization are pleased to announce that CABARET will celebrate its highly-anticipated L.A. engagement at Hollywood Pantages Theatre for a limited three-week run from July 19 – August 7, 2016.
ABOUT THE SHOW:     As part of their 50th Anniversary Season, the critically acclaimed and award-winning Roundabout Theatre Company is proud to present Sam Mendes (SkyfallAmerican Beauty) and Rob Marshall’s (Into the Woods and Chicago, thefilms)

Tony Award®-winning production of CABARET.

 

Come hear some of the most memorable songs in theatre history, including “Cabaret,” “Willkommen” and “Maybe This Time.” Leave your troubles outside – life is beautiful at CABARETJohn KanderFred Ebb and Joe Masteroff’s Tony-winning musical about following your heart while the world loses its way.


PERFORMANCE INFORMATION:          Tickets are available at www.HollywoodPantages.com or www.Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-982-2787, as well as at the Hollywood PantagesBox Office (6233 Hollywood Blvd) and all Ticketmaster Outlets. The

performance schedule for CABARET is Tuesday through Friday at 8pm, Saturday at 2pm & 8pm and Sunday at 1pm & 6:30pm. Recommended for Ages13 and Up. (Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theatre. All patrons must have a ticket, regardless of age.) Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes including intermission. Tickets start at $29 in the orchestra.

Posted in Los Angeles, music, Theatre Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 14th, 2016 by Cherry

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J. Harrison Ghee and Adam Kaplan in the National Tour of Kinky Boots

 IMG_7078The smash-hit musical that brings together four-time Tony® Award-winner Harvey Fierstein (Book) and Grammy® Award-winning rock icon Cyndi Lauper Tony Award-winner for Best Score is at the Pantages from April 13 – 24, 2016.

You have to head to Hollywood and have a blast with the Kinky Boots touring show at the Pantages till April 24th. I went with my bestie Briian and we were smitten from the opening song! I adore the interpretation of the musical IMG_7062
from my beloved film since it’s not mimicking it but instead takes overall message of respect, individuality, friendship and shoe love!

Kinky Boots National Touring Company6
This is the first time I’ve seen the Tony Award winning musical and was ecstatic to hear that Kinky Boots was returning to the Hollywood Pantages Theatre. The music is from Cyndi Lauper, pop queen and Grammy and Tony Award winner and choreography with the two time Tony Award winner Jerry Mitchell all of this feet tapping was from four time Tony Award winner Harvey Fierstein. But the heart of the musical is how it reached everyone in the audience. One of my favorite songs is the duet ‘Not my Father’s Son’ with Lola & Charlie cementing the basis of their Kinky Boots National Touring Company2connection and friendship. Really all the music was part of the tapestry of reminding all of us to accept others and let people be themselves. It’s such a human connection that translates to people from all walks of life and all over the world that it transcends boots .. even kinky boots! In case you never saw the movie and don’t get the ‘red boots’ this is a story of Charlie Price a young man who was trying to chart his own path to London when his father dies unexpectedly and he’s called pack to his small town with the weight of a shoe factory bearing down on him. As he tries to figure out how to keep the doors open after a return disaster he stumbles upon Lola being accosted by ruffians on the street. He play Prince Charming out to rescue the damsel in distress who turns out that the glass slipper isn’t fitting quite right. But from a night of unexpected surprises we go from London to Northampton, England to the Milan, Italy Shoe Fashion Week catwalks … well what happens between is what makes it Kinky Boots.
Tiffany Engen in the National Tour of Kinky Boots

 

This is a fabulous show with such humor interwoven with a core hurt that I had tears in my eyes as I was laughing. It’s a show that is musical magic and will make you want to run out and buy 5 inch heels .. if you can walk in them as well as the cast dances in costumes that dazzled my eyes. Especially the boots .. I LOVED the boots! The chemistry between J. Harrison Ghee (Lola) and Adam Kaplan (Charlie Price) are the bedrock that the rest of cast rises with to belt out songs who’s message is timeless. I don’t want to give away too much but if your a fan of the movie GO SEE THIS MUSICAL! If you’ve never seen the movie .. GO SEE THIS MUSICAL! It’s a rare treat that is as delightful as finding the perfect shoes that are cute AND comfortable! The show is at the Pantages from now until April 24th.

 

 

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Saying hi to Cyndi Lauper’s Hollywood Star!

 

The Nederlander Organization is pleased to announce that the L.A. return engagement of the smash hit musical  KINKY BOOTS,  that brings together four-time Tony® Award-winner Harvey Fierstein (Book) and Grammy® Award-winning rock icon Cyndi Lauper (Tony Award-winner for Best Score for KinkyBoots), will celebrate its highly anticipated red carpet celebration on Wednesday, April 13, 2016 at the Hollywood Pantages Theatre for a limited engagement through April 24, 2016.

ABOUT THE SHOW:  Inspired by true events, KINKY BOOTS takes you from a gentlemen’s shoe factory in Northampton to the glamorous catwalks of Milan. Charlie Price is struggling to live up to his father’s expectations and continue the family business of Price & Son. With the factory’s future hanging in the balance, help arrives in the unlikely but spectacular form of Lola, a fabulous performer in need of some sturdy new stilettos.

Kinky Boots National Touring Company3

PERFORMANCE INFORMATION: Tickets are available at www.hollywoodpantages.com or www.Ticketmaster.com or by calling 1-800-982-2787, as well as at the Hollywood Pantages Box Office (6233 Hollywood Blvd) and all Ticketmaster Outlets. The performance schedule for KINKY BOOTS is Tuesday through Friday at 8pm, Saturday at 2pm & 8pm, and Sunday at 1pm & 6:30pm. Recommended for Ages 13 and Up. (Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theatre. All patrons must have a ticket, regardless of age.) Running Time: 2 hours and 30 minutes including intermission. Tickets start at $25 in the orchestra.

Posted in LGBT, Los Angeles, music, Theatre Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

April 8th, 2016 by Cherry

Disney The Little Mermaid In Concert Live to Film at Hollywood Bowl starring Sara Bareilles, Rebel Wilson & More – PRESALE

 

 
The Little Mermaid In Concert Live to Film
EXCLUSIVE PRE-SALE!
Today at 10AM PDT through Fri, Apr 8 at 10PM PDT
Get advance tickets to
The Little Mermaid In Concert Live to Film at the Hollywood Bowl on Saturday, June 4, 2016.
For tickets, call 1-800-745-3000 or visit ticketmaster.com.
PASSWORD:
VOICE
Public Onsale: Saturday, April 9 at 10AM PDT
Get Tickets

Posted in Animated, Geek Fun, Los Angeles, music, Theatre Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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