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April 22nd, 2018 by Cherry

Benedict Cumberbatch is coming to Showtime in ‘Patrick Melrose’ a five part limited series that he executive produced and stars in on Saturday, May 12th at 9PM ET/PT. Edward St. Aubyn is the author of the autobiographical novels based on his surviving childhood that crisscrosses the globe from the South of France to Image result for Edward St. AubynNew York to Britain from the 60s to the early 2000’s. His parents will be played by Academy Award® nominee Jennifer Jason Leigh (The Hateful Eight) and Screen Actors Guild® winner Hugo Weaving (The Matrix trilogy). In addition the cast includes Anna Madeley (The Crown), Blythe Danner (Meet the Fockers), Allison Williams (Get Out), Pip Torrens (The Crown), Jessica Raine (Call the Midwife), Prasanna Puwanarajah (Doctor Foster), Holliday Grainger (THE BORGIAS, Bonnie & Clyde), Indira Varma (Game of Thrones), and Celia Imrie (Bridget Jones’s Baby).

Image result for Patrick Melrose Novels
The series is a co-production between SHOWTIME and Sky Atlantic where each episode of the series will be based on one of five novels written for television by BAFTA Award® nominee David Nicholls (Far from the Madding Crowd, One Day), directed by Edward Berger (Deutchland 83, Jack), executive produced by Michael Jackson and Oscar nominee and Emmy and Golden Globe® winning producer Rachael Horovitz (Moneyball, Grey Gardens). Jackson, the former Channel Four and IAC executive, recently formed the drama banner Two Cities Television. It is the company’s first production. Cumberbatch executive produces along with Adam Ackland for SunnyMarch, and Helen Flint serves as executive producer for Little Island Productions.

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April 4th, 2018 by Cherry
AN EVENING WITH BOB NEWHART: A “NEWHART” CELEBRATION
AT THE PALEY CENTER FOR MEDIA AND HULU


I grew up watching Bob Newhart and am beyond excited that he’s coming to the Paley Center on Thursday, April 26th to discuss his long career. In case you don’t know Mr. Newhart he is an Emmy and Grammy winning entertainer who’s humor has kept generation of fans laughing. The show I most loved was Newhart (1982-1990). I have fond memories of watching the series with my entire family (parents, younger siblings, grandparents, aunts, cousins) where we laughed AND water cooler talked before they even had a name for repeating TV show lines! The complete first season of Newhart is now available to stream on Hulu and if you have never seen the show get ready to laugh about a slice of life series. Newhart is set in a rural Vermont Inn where he’s an author who’s juggling being an innkeeper, marriage and zany neighbors in the great outdoors.

Image result for newhart showMr. Newhart will be joined by series cast members Julia Duffy and William Sanderson. Fans will also be able to watch iconic video from the series personally selected by Mr. Newhart from the Paley Archive which has the world’s largest publicly accessible archive of TV and radio programming. Tickets go on sale TODAY for Paley Center Supporting and Patron Members so if you are a fan I recommend buying tickets ASAP. This is a rare opportunity to hear him speak about his work in the television industry from a TV master of comedy that has influenced generations of comedic actors, writers and creators.

“When I started the Newhart project, I told myself I was going to employ the formula I found that worked with The Bob Newhart Show,” said Mr. Newhart.  “Surround yourself with absolutely the most gifted cast that is possible to assemble, and an incredible and supportive writing staff, and take all the credit yourself.  It worked both times.”

“Bob Newhart has entertained generations of television audiences and we’re thrilled to welcome him to the Paley Center,” said Maureen J. Reidy, the Paley Center’s President & CEO. “This program is the perfect addition to our PaleyLive LA spring season and promises to be a memorable and entertaining look at one of television’s most beloved comedies.”

Tickets go on sale to Paley Center Supporting and Patron Members on April 4, 2018, at 12:00 pm PT; for Paley Center Individual Members on April 5, 2018, at 9:00 am PT; and to the general public on April 6, 2018, at 9:00 am PT. For more information, panel updates, and to purchase tickets, please visit paleycenter.org

PaleyLive programs offer television fans the rare opportunity to engage with the cast and creative teams of their favorite programs in intimate settings held at The Paley Center for Media in Beverly Hills. All PaleyLive programs are selected by the Paley Center to not only expand society’s understanding of the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, but also for their ability to educate and entertain the public.

 

About The Paley Center for Media: The Paley Center for Media, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with locations in New York and Los Angeles, leads the discussion about the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, radio, and emerging platforms. Drawing upon its curatorial expertise, an international collection, and close relationships with the leaders of the media community, the Paley Center examines the intersections between media and society. The general public can access the Paley Center’s permanent media collection, which contains over 160,000 television and radio programs and advertisements and participate in programs that explore and celebrate the creativity, the innovations, the personalities, and the leaders who are shaping media. Through the global programs of its Media Council and International Council, the Paley Center also serves as a neutral setting where media professionals can engage in discussion and debate about the evolving media landscape. Previously known as The Museum of Television & Radio, the Paley Center was founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, a pioneering innovator in the industry. For more information, please visit paleycenter.org.

 

Posted in Comedy, Los Angeles, Talk, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

April 1st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
Composer Mark Rivers shares his experience on Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

       I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Mark Rivers

Rivers is a writer, producer, and composer for television. He is best known for his work on Parks and Recreation, and Kroll Show, and most recently Netflix’s Big Mouth.

 

Q: Can you talk to me about your writing process on Big Mouth?

A: Sure! The process usually goes something like… there are a lot of songs in the show. Not a lot, but they’re enough.

Q: There’s a lot.

A: They’re enough. There’s plenty of songs. Usually, as they’re writing the script, the writers and the producers will hit upon a moment where they think, “You know, this moment could use a musical number,” and that’s when they give me a call… “Hey, episode 208, we got a song coming up for you. We want to talk about that.” So we’ll either get on the phone or we’ll meet at their offices and just talk through what they want this musical moment to be. The style of music… we’ve done everything from big band to disco to flamingo… so I never know what’s coming down the pike. My job is to take that moment and to understand the characters’ voices enough, and to understand the story and the script enough to write lyrics that service that moment. So, I’ll go away and shuffle around in my backyard, write a bunch of lyrics, come up with a song, send them a demo, and… cross my fingers that they like it. Usually, they’ll come back with a few notes here and there, and then I’ll run with it… produce it, get the cast members in to sing it. Turn it into something that works in the show. Beyond that, the scoring is very different. That comes much later, when there’s an animatic to score to. We’ll sit down together and we’ll go through like, “That could use some music right there! What about that?” and we’ll have some temporary library music in place. “I can do something better and bigger, that fits the moment better,” It’s back and forth like that. I’ll send them stuff, they’ll have notes, and then back and forth until we’re all happy with it.

Q: How much freedom are you allowed in that process? Do they let you do whatever you want?

BMI Composer Mark Rivers talks working on Netflix’s Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: Yeah, they trust me to run with it, and if they don’t like what I’ve done they’ll point out why… particularly lyrically. I’m really psyched that they’ve come to just trust me, lyrically. It’s always a bit difficult to inherit a bunch of lyrics… “Stick to these lyrics, don’t change anything…” It compromises the flow of a song. It’s just hard to write music that way. So they give me a lot of freedom… you know, once we’ve agreed upon a direction, the parameters that I should be working within. So yeah. Enough. I’m given enough freedom.

Q: Can I just say that Big Mouth is so, so funny, and I think that the music 

is the funniest part of it.

A: Oh cool! Really? Well, thanks. Thank you

Q: You did Parks & Rec, which is also so funny. I’m just a fan, I guess.

A: Oh good. I’m a fan of the show, too.

Q: What do you do in your free time?

A: I chase my kid around. I have an eight-year-old girl who’s not allowed to watch Big Mouth. I hang out with my wife and my kid.

Q: Do you listen to music? Or is it too much like work?

A: I try to. I have to make the effort to do it. My wife just bought me an Alexa, which immediately my daughter took over. Now she’s got someone to boss around. But I try to listen to more music. I don’t listen to as much as I used to… it’s hard to find stuff that’s like, “Wow, this is new and exciting!” like you did when you were a teenager and in your 20s. I find myself going back to stuff that I liked then… and I watch baseball and I drink beer, stuff like that. But that’s boring.

Q: So I’m really into choir music.

A: Yeah?

Q: Did you ever sing in a choir?

A: Did I ever sing in a choir? When I was a little kid. Well, in high school I sang in the Festival Chorale. I was a band nerd for a while, and then I joined the Festival Chorale because my friends were in it. They got to travel to Washington, D.C. every year and secretly party in the hotel rooms. That’s what I wanted to do.

Q: That’s what everyone wants to do when they go.

A: Yeah, yeah. It was more of the social aspect that drew me than the singing.

Q: Can I ask how you got into scoring, specifically T.V. shows?

A: Yeah… when I was a young man, I knew… I was playing in rock bands forever, but all my friends were comedians. I was living in Boston. I was friends with this whole budding Boston comedy scene. David Cross, who is a very old friend… and Marc Maron, and Louis C.K. and Jon Benjamin… these are all my friends and they liked my band and we would hang out. Years later when I moved to Boston, I had done Mr. Show with Bob and David– an old HBO sketch comedy show-I did that theme song… these guys were starting to get shows. My career as a rock musician had [raspberry sound effect, slams hand on table] grounded out. But these guys were taking off. I got into comedy writing, but also into writing music for these guys because they were old friends. They hired me because they knew me. I suppose they figured, “We can do worse than this guy.”

Q: Do you have a favorite composer?

A: I don’t. I don’t think I do. I mean… Beethoven? Have you heard of Beethoven?

Q: No. Who?

A: I don’t think I do. I have my favorite pop musicians. I was a huge Elvis Costello, XTC fan. That’s what most excited me when I was starting to write rock songs, pop songs. Bowie and The Beatles… other people, too. But I mean, that was sort of the foundation of all the stuff I liked. As far as T.V. composers there are people I like. I’ll hear music on other shows and think, “Oh, that guy’s pretty good! That Dave Porter guy is pretty good!” There’s a guy that does music on a kids show called Masha and the Bear, he writes these great little weird, off-kilter pop songs. They’re really good. Occasionally something will grab my ear, but I wouldn’t say… I’m too old to be a fan of anybody anymore.

Q: Do you read any comics?

A: I don’t. I don’t. The last comic I read… I liked Eightball. I was an Eightball fan. Dan Clowes… I know there are other people sort of like him and in the graphic novel world… I never kept up with it. I have a kid now…

Q: She doesn’t like comics?

A: Not yet! Maybe she’ll get into them. She likes reading. She likes books. She likes Judy Blume.

Q: I loved Judy Blume.

A: She was gonna read Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret and we were like, “No no no no no, not yet!” She’s eight.

Posted in Animated, Comedy, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , , , , ,

April 1st, 2018 by Cherry

I loved the Walt Disney Television Animation and Buena Vista Television animated series Gargoyles created by Greg Weisman (1994 to 1997). Like many fans I’ve wanted more of these characters so am beyond excited that the award-winning filmmaker Carlos Ferrer has made a short short fan film in hopes of getting approval from Disney to helm a movie with the great characters. The series may have been for kids but I watched as young adult and fell in love with the voices, storylines of being ‘out of time’, friendship, loyalty and heroism. If you’ve never seen the series it follows a clan of night creatures aka Gargoyles who protect modern New York City as they did in Scotland when they wake up after nightfall. Ferrer has directed, edited, animated and scored the fan film out of love for the characters and stories.

I need as many views as possible to convince producers and execs that my vision of a live action Gargoyles film will work for audiences and fans. It’s a rich story with a great message – a fantasy set in the real world and with today’s technology it could be fantastic. I grew up with this so I feel like I really know what has to be done. So it’s really about getting as much exposure as possible with the fans and others who may not know about the show“,Carlos Ferrer.

About Carlos Ferrer

Ferrer is an award-winning American filmmaker with over fifteen years experience in production and storytelling. At the age of sixteen, he directed over one hundred cast and crew members on a feature-length film that later won “Best Student Feature” at the Long Island Film Festival. Ferrer studied Film at SUNY Purchase College, graduating in 2008 with a Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre Arts & Film. His credits include the 2016 film Retina and short film The Popcorn Man.

What did you think of the short? Leave a comment below if you want to see a feature length live action or animated film of the beloved series ….

Posted in Animated, Film, free, geek tv, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

March 31st, 2018 by Aiyonna White
(L to R): Composers and panelists Mark Rivers, Tim Kiefer, Ryan Elder, and Tom Howe at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Tom Howe

Howe is an award-winning film and television composer and is most known for his work on Wonder Woman and Legend of Tarzan. He has recently worked on the new animated film Early Man.

 

Q: How’s your Wondercon going? Did you just get here?

A: I just got here, and it’s great. I didn’t realize it was such a big thing. Seeing everyone walking around in their costumes was fantastic. I think Americans do things bigger and better than anywhere else.

Q: Are you from England?

A: I am.

Q: I didn’t know that.

A: Yeah. I’m from there. Lived here four years, though.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about Early Man?

A: Yeah. I came on to that project 10 weeks from when we recorded which was November. My co-writer, who is Harry Gregson-Williams, he called me and asked me if I’d like to co-write the movie with him, and I then flew over to London to meet Nick Park and the team. Hung out there for a couple of days just getting to know everybody, visiting sets, and came back and then we started writing, trying to get things approved because we didn’t have a lot of time before we actually had to record. But the movie was fairly complete by that point. Some things change but a lot of the animation had been done because it takes like four or five years for them to get it together, because it’s very slow. It’s frame by frame filmmaking. It was just a great opportunity to be a part of and a fantastic process.

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

A: My parents are both musical, and…my dad plays the organ, piano, guitar, and things, but he played the organ in church and my mom sung in the choir, so I did a lot of singing when I was younger. I started piano at about four or five or something. I took up the guitar at eight, I think, and then the clarinet later, a few things like that. I studied music and orchestration and things later on. I thought originally I was going to be in a band and be a songwriter. That’s what I really wanted to do, but I got a lot of people asking me to do string arrangements for songs, so I ended up going more in that direction. Somebody who I’d been in college with, who had nothing to do with music, but she got a job at a television channel. She called me they needed some music for a very small thing

Composer of Early Man, Tom Howe talks animation at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

they were doing. A two minute long student film that they were putting out that day, and I did that. I’d suddenly found that I’d switched directions from what I thought I was gonna do to writing music for media. After that, that producer went on to do something else and I worked with him, then. One thing sort of snowballed to the other. I always knew I was going to do music, whether it was songwriting or film work or whatever.

 

Q: What music do you listen to in your free time?

A: Uhm….

Q: If you like to listen to music in your free time.

A: Funnily enough, because you’re on a film or T.V. show and you’re writing music it can be 18 hours a day for six-and-a-half days a week, sometimes seven when you’re getting near the end. There isn’t really a lot of time to listen to music outside of that, and I almost don’t want to. So I actually I find I listen to a lot of talk radio because I want to hear something but I need it to be almost like white noise that just distracts me rather than something musical. But if I get the chance… I’ve got three kids who listen to all kinds of different things. Usually, it will be whatever they’re listening to, because if we’re driving somewhere in the car, that will take priority over whatever I want to listen to.

Q: You talked a little bit about being in choirs?

A: Yeah.

Q: I love choir. Do you have a favorite choir composer?

A: Yeah, I love Morten Lauridsen, who I think is amazing. He and actually Eric Whitacre is another guy. Eric Whitacre is quite similar to Morten Lauridsen, but there’s a piece called “O Magnum Mysterium” by Lauridsen and I think it’s fantastic. The really close kind of voice writing. A lot of divisi cuts and clashes but… I don’t think there’s anything like the voice… strings get pretty close maybe, but I think that there’s nothing like just voices for everything, really. For emotion, for written things… one of the films I remember seeing growing up was a film called Cry Freedom. This sort of fantastic African choir, just the sound of it obliterated everything else in the movie in terms of the musical stuff. I thought they were amazing. But those are probably the two that I’ve been listening to, recently anyway. I think they’re both great.

Q: I sang that piece in high school.

A: Really?

Q: I loved it. It was beautiful.

A: It’s great, isn’t it?

Q: It was a lot of work.

A: I was gonna say, it’s not an easy thing to sing. There’s a lot or very close writing that then resolves, isn’t it? You’re clashing for quite a bit. But yeah, it’s a great piece of music.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about your role in the Wonder Woman movie?

A: Sure, yes. I was an additional composer on that movie for Rupert Gregson-Williams. That really involves… well, on a movie like that there was, again not a lot of time to put it together, but also there’s a lot of minutes of music. So, I’ll take on some scenes, basically, on Rupert’s behalf and I’ll either take a theme that he’s written-obviously all the main themes are by him and he’s doing the bulk of the movie- and I’ll work that theme into the scene that I’m doing. Or it could be a stand-alone scene that therefore isn’t hugely affecting the arc, then I’ll take that on just to kind of mean that he has not got to do it. So I probably took eight or nine, ten scenes in the movie, something like that. Just try to help out, really. It’s not uncommon on some of these big movies to have one or two other people kind of running alongside you trying to get it all done. Particularly when on a movie of that scale, where the picture’s changing a lot, so there’s a lot of musical conforms to do as well as writing. You’re permanently trying to keep up with the latest version of the picture. It’s just a lot of work that needs to be done. I’ve done that on several different movies for different people, but it’s a great thing to do, I think because you get the experience of working on a huge movie-you’re part of it, your music’s going into the film-but you slightly can stand back from the pressure of being in the firing line as the lead composer if they don’t like it at all. You can learn a lot doing it. It’s good fun. The movie turned out well didn’t it? It was huge. It was very successful.

Q: I loved that movie.

A: Second one’s coming.

Q: Do you read comics at all?

A: I haven’t for many years. A friend of mine collects the original ones and he seems to have an amazing collection of very valuable comics, as well. Do you collect them?

Q: I don’t collect them because I’ve seen that it’s not valuable. But it’s cool to read, I guess. If I really like a piece then I’ll buy it. How much freedom do get when you’re composing?

A: It depends on the project actually. Fairly- initially, anyway- a fairly big degree of flexibility in what you can do and theme ideas, and things. But, fundamentally, writing film music you’re always serving the filmmakers vision, the studio, the other people involved. So you have to respect that. I think sometimes, in the case of like Early Man. I was on for ten weeks, Nick Park was on for six years, so he’s going to have a better idea of what it is and what he wants than I am. I can’t absorb that in that short amount of time, and I have to start writing straight away. I’ve only got ten days before I’m trying to be at the same speed. I think you do get freedom, but at the same time people know what they want and you are trying to serve a higher purpose. Otherwise, you can go write concert music.

 

Follow Tom Howe on Twitter: @howe_tom

Posted in Animated, art, Comic Books, Comic Con, Film, geek tv, Movie, music, TV Tagged with: , , , ,

March 30th, 2018 by Aiyonna White

By Aiyonna White, Contributor

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Ryan Elder

Elder is a television and film composer best known for his work on Rick and Morty. He has also composed music for The Wizards of Waverly Place and the upcoming Boss Baby television series.

 

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: When I was a kid my family was very musical. I took violin lessons when I was five and my dad had a little recording studio in our home, and he would help me write songs and produce them. I would write boyband songs when I was seven. So I’ve always been in music then in college I got a degree in composition, and after college, I had an opportunity to do an internship at a company that did music for commercials. I started working with them and I did commercial music for about 11 years and then during that time I became friends with the creators of Rick and Morty and they brought me on when it was time to do the show.

Q: How much freedom do you get in composing music or picking which songs go into an episode?

A: For picking the songs, I’m not involved in that, generally. That’s some other people. Showrunners or producers pick the songs. For the original music that I write, I actually get a ton of freedom. Basically, they send me the cuts with no music and I just do whatever I want. I get a lot of freedom. They generally like what I do and don’t have a ton of notes for me. What you hear is my idea. It’s pretty sweet. I’m pretty lucky.  

Q: You have some great songs. My friends and I sang “Get Schwifty” for at least a year after we saw the episode.

A: [laughter]

Q: In the video you did with “Great Big Story” you talked about musical easter eggs. Can you tell me another one?

A: [laughter] I think when we filmed that episode seven of season three wasn’t out yet… it’s hard to explain. They’re not so point-outable as the “Jerry Daycare” one I mentioned in that video. In episode seven, I think it’s called “The Ricklantis Mixup,” I created a whole new sound of music for that episode. So there’s a lot of callbacks to the same sort of thematic material in that episode which I don’t always do. I barely ever use the theme song as a part of the score, just a couple of times. One time when Pickle Rick jumps out of the toilet, and stuff like that… so… yeah. Sorry, it’s not the most satisfying answer.

Q: That’s okay. Can you tell me about the process that you go through when you’re composing a piece?

A: I try to be as informed by the story that’s being told as much as possible. For me, the most important thing is helping to tell the story. The first thing I usually do is watch the episode and figure out, “Okay, do I have any questions about what’s happening here- questions about character motivations-is the audience supposed to feel tense in this scene or are the characters tense and we’re not?” For me, the first step is just nailing down, “What moods do I need to hit here to tell the story the way that Justin and Dan, the creators, want?” Then, after that, it’s like…  as with any composer we all have like a bag of tricks that we pull from. And I could get really inside baseball and tell you like “Oh, I use the tremolo strings when I need this and blah blah blah,” but the basic thing is, I have the sounds that I go to for different moods and it’s all dependent on the mood or the story that needs to be told.

Q: Are some things easier to score than others?

A: Absolutely. There’s definitely scenes where the music is very much taking a backseat and in those scenes, it’s a lot of just pressing one note on the keyboard for a long time. Those are easy, right? Some are like very much more challenging, like writing the songs. “Goodbye Moonmen,” that was like a process. It didn’t take me very long once I started writing the music but I needed to prepare by listening to a bunch of David Bowie and figuring out how those lyrics were gonna work… y’know… it just depends.

Q: Just really quick, did you do “Get Schwifty”? Was that you?

A: I did not. I’ll talk about it in the panel, actually.

Q: I’m so sorry.

A: No, that’s okay. Because… this is one of the questions from the panel, actually, but those songs were done for a really small flash game that Adult Swim released. It was a mobile game or something. Morty finds Summer’s iPod in that game, and on the iPod, there’re three songs, and they all are featured in Season 2. “Get Schwifty” and “Head Bent Over” are two of them. Justin just improvised those lyrics over some stock music. When it came time to do the episode of “Get Schwifty” all the writers loved those songs so much from the game they said, “Let’s do a whole episode based around these songs,” At that point, it was like,  “Let’s not reinvent the wheel. These songs are funny. Let’s keep the music as is.” I wasn’t really involved with them. I mean, I kinda mixed and mastered to make them sound good for T.V.  but for the most part, it was just Justin improvising lyrics over these stock music.

BMI Composer Ryan Elder, discusses music in Rick & Morty at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

 

Q: What do you like to listen to in your free time?

A: I like a lot of moody… [laughter] I listen to sad music. My wife always gives me shit about it but right now I’m into Sufjan Stevens

 

Q: I love him!

A: Yeah, Carrie & Lowell, I think is like one of the best records of all time.

 

Q: When he sang at the Oscars I was just [grabs chest dramatically].

A: Ugh. So good. And then, I’m into this band Tennis, if you know Tennis. One of the reasons I got into them is because they invited me to their show. They’re big fans of Rick and Morty, so it’s like, “Oh, I’ll become fans of you guys then,”…y’know, I tend to listen to… if I’m going to listen to new stuff it’s a lot of stuff that my friends and people I know are working on. That’s the short answer.

Q: So, I’m really into choir.

A: Okay.

Q: Just out of curiosity, have you ever sung in a choir?

A: I was in my high school choir and then in college, I was in an acapella group. The Macalester Traditions, I’ll shout them out. It was fun. [laughter] I learned a lot about-because I would do arrangements for them, in addition to singing- I would arrange a lot of the songs that we sang. So I learned a lot of stuff doing that, that I use on a regular basis. All the background vocals on “Goodbye Moonmen” are stuff that I would have done in the acapella group for sure. I want to hear an acapella group do “Goodbye Moonmen,” I hope there’s one out there that wants to try it.

Q: Do you have a favorite composer right now?

A: My all time favorite film composer is Jerry Goldsmith. I’m super influenced by him a lot. I mean, he was a master, and just incredible. He did some of my favorite movies, and certainly some of my favorite scores, like “The Planet of the Apes” score. It’s just mind-blowing. Whenever I get stuck on Rick and Morty, i’ll just put on the “Alien” score or something and try to be inspired by that. He’s definitely up there.

Q: What other music do you listen to?

A: I’ll just list off things. We just got Spotify, so I’ve been re-exploring stuff from when I was in high school and I’m old, so it’s all 90’s alternative stuff. I’m also way into… went way down the rabbit hole into “New Jack Swing” which is a style of music that was only around for like, five years in the late 80’s early 90’s. It was really specific. Bobby Brown, Ronnie DeVoe, these bands that did this really specific style of music. I got way into that and just started listening to every song I could find of that. As far as new stuff, I really like Miike Snow, if you know that group… Haim. I like pop music that is not radio pop music, but it’s pop-y. Things with good hooks, good melodies, that’s what I look for in what I listen to for fun. It’s hard as a composer, I will say, and I bet these other guys here with me today will say the same thing. When your hobby becomes your job, then your job is your hobby. You don’t really want to listen to more music on your time off. So I listen to a lot of comedy podcasts and stuff like that.

Q: Which ones?

A: I’m a huge “Comedy Bang! Bang!” Fan. My friend’s podcast “Beyond Yacht Rock Podcast” is really good. They come up with a new genre of music every week. It’s really fun. Any of the Earwolf stuff, the Comedy Bang! Bang! Spin-offs. I listen to my bosses podcast “Harmontown”, fairly regularly to see what’s going on with him. I shouldn’t tell him I listen to that. [laughter] I’ve been getting into the true crime podcasts like everyone else.

Q: Do you read comics?

A: When I was a kid I collected them. In the 90’s there was this huge boom when Image and Valiant were new publishers and everyone wanted them. I collected them because I thought they were gonna worth something. I read them, too- which I know is not a good combo. Reading them, and thinking they’re going to be worth something don’t really go well together. But, I haven’t read comics much lately. But I like comics, actually. I have so many hobbies. I play Magic: The Gathering all the time. I just have too many hobbies. Can’t make time for everything.

 

Follow Ryan Elder on Twitter: @RyanElderMusic

Posted in Animated, Comic Con, geek tv, music, TV Tagged with: , ,

March 18th, 2018 by Aiyonna White

By Aiyonna White, Contributor

 

       When asked about the various social issues the show addressed in the first season, Seth MacFarlane – creator of the Star Trek inspired television show The Orville – stated that “good science fiction should be topical.” 

HOLLYWOOD, CA – MARCH 17: Cast of The Orville attend PaleyFest LA 2018 honoring The Orville, presented by The Paley Center for Media, at the DOLBY THEATRE on March 17, 2018 in Hollywood, California. © Michael Bulbenko for the Paley Center

        “The reaction to that episode [Season 1 Episode 3 “About A Girl”] initially was… a lot of weird hostility about it. ‘Who do you think you are writing about this stuff?’ The reaction 

from the fans was the opposite.”

        The Paley Center for Media hosts PaleyFest once a year to honor exceptional television series. Held on March 17, The Orville panel is the second event of the festival, second to Barbra Streisand herself. The panels begin with an episode screening and are followed by a Q&A between the moderator, creators and cast, and the audience.

        It’s true that the fan favorite series does not shy away from difficult conversations, having covered religion, xenophobia, sexism, and other touchy topics in the first season. It’s also true that science fiction as a genre was created to entertain intellectually and leave the viewer with questions about societal norms (Shoutout to the Horror, Science Fiction and Fantasy class I’m taking this semester!) “In this genre there really should be nothing off-limits,” MacFarlane concludes, citing The Twilight Zone, which is known for it’s social commentary. My personal favorite of the cast, actress Penny Johnson added that “fans are smarter than people think,” and could, therefore, handle discussion on tough topics. J.Lee, 

who plays Lt. John LaMarr said, “I like the fact that we throw a lot of stuff at the wall…we talk about stuff with a camera on that we all talk about anyway.”

        The Orville is an endearing series, and the panel was a delightful insight into the casts’ personalities ties and dedication to the series. Here are some key moments:

“More tongue!”

While filming episode 9 “Cupid’s Dagger,” Johnson was told by MacFarlane to do “more tongue,” MacFarlane ended the story with, ”Needless to say, my time was up.”

Chad wanted to sit on the egg

Chad L. Coleman, who plays Bortus’ partner Klyden, asked MacFarlane why Bortus sat on the egg to hatch their child when Klyden was the more traditionally domestic of the pair. MacFarlane

responded, “You’ve thought more about that than I have.”

The Ant Story

Scott Grimes aka Lt. Gordon Malloy told a story about the time when 40-50 ants crawled into Peter Macon’s prosthetic face during a nap, which resulted in a chorus of disgusted groans from the audience. “It was 5 or 6,” Macon corrected, who plays Lt. Cmdr. Bortus on the show. “…and if I rip this [makeup] off I’m ripping my skin off with it, so I had to beat myself in the face to kill the ants.”

HOLLYWOOD, CA – MARCH 17: Cast of The Orville attends PaleyFest LA 2018 honoring The Orville, presented by The Paley Center for Media, at the DOLBY THEATRE on March 17, 2018 in Hollywood, California. © Brian To for the Paley Center

Gross.

 

Ed and Kelly’s relationship  

The season finale ended with a harsh but necessary breakup for the couple. When asked about the future of the relationship, MacFarlane responded, “Watch. You gotta watch. I’m not gonna tell you,” to boos from the audience.

Sealing the Deal

A fan asked MacFarlane how he was able to bring the show to fruition. MacFarlane said, “I tend to do things that I want to watch and space sci-fi has been kind of neglected for a long time. Everything was serialized and everything was really dark, and I missed the optimistic, hopeful sci-fi that is not necessarily a cautionary tale…it just went from there.”

A Light in the Room

“On behalf of the Catholic church, I’m pissed.” A fan opened his question with this joke about the season finale, resulting in a lot of laughs. He then asked the cast to speak on their power to shape culture. Johnson revealed that as a Christian she’s been judged by her peers for appearing on the show. “What you want to do is present the issues and be generous and loving about them to allow people to make their own decisions…If you’re not a part of being the light in the room, you’re just allowing anything to be talked about. My thing is to always be a light in the room.” On playing Claire, Johnson says, “I find it extraordinary. Seth and the rest of the writers have allowed me to be three-dimensional, and not this one dimension that we get stuck on. I get to do everything, and my God I am so excited because if you don’t see me on television it’s going to be somebody else so I’ll be missing my calling which is sinful anyway.” Do you see why she’s my favorite?  

Peter Macon wore a KISS mask for at least a few months

Peter Macon revealed that after the made-for-TV Kiss movie came out in the 1970s, he wanted to be Gene Simmons for Halloween and also all the time. He wore the KISS mask 24/7, including one particular June day on the City Bus with his mom. “I feel for her now being a parent,” Macon says. “I needed to wear that mask. A little black kid in Chicago wearing a KISS mask…I imagine myself as a little kid watching [The Orville] like I watched Battlestar Galactica, and being a part of something that can go into someone’s young consciousness, I see that kid walking around in a KISS mask in June…I wasn’t told that I can’t wear the mask at all. It helped blossom my consciousness and I hope that with this kind of work I can do the same thing for some little kid.”

The Hardest Script for Seth MacFarlane to Write

“Nothing that I’ve found. I’ve been in comedy for years and I’ve never had an easier, smoother time writing than on this show. I was probably in the wrong business.” We can leave it at that.

HOLLYWOOD, CA – MARCH 17: Cast and creatives of The Orville attend PaleyFest LA 2018 honoring The Orville, presented by The Paley Center for Media, at the DOLBY THEATRE on March 17, 2018 in Hollywood, California. © Emily Kneeter for the Paley Center

Season 2 Spoilers?

MacFarlane reveals that there is an episode in season 2 that doesn’t have a sci-fi plot. “It’s all character pieces and that to me is the essence of what a good sci-fi show should be able to do. The character should be so strong that if you want to do a story that is pure drama or pure comedy you should be able to do that.”

What’s the deal with Kermit the Frog?

Viewers of the show know that MacFarlane’s character Capt. Ed Mercer has a Kermit doll on his desk that he idolizes. When asked if his obsession “extends to all muppets,” MacFarlane said, “I love The Muppets. The Great Muppet Caper is one of the best musicals ever made. I’m a big Henson fan. I was always astonished by what he pulled off. Kermit is basically a sock puppet with eyes. There’s so much personality in him and I feel that he never got his due as an actor. There’s so much soul in that character.” I adore Jim Henson praise as -fun fact- he graduated from the University of Maryland-College Park, not far from my hometown. Naturally, the panel ended with MacFarlane’s Kermit impersonation.

Posted in Comedy, geek tv, Los Angeles, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

February 19th, 2018 by Cherry

It’s the beginning of the end for Star War’s Rebels on Disney XD tonight starting at (9:00 p.m.) with two episodes ‘Jedi Night’ and ‘Dume’ as fans count down to the series finale on Monday, March 5th. It’s going to be three weeks of double episodes every Monday. 

 

STAR WARS REBELS – FEBRUARY 19, 2018 (9:00 – 10:00 p.m. ET/PT)

“Jedi Night” finds our intrepid rebellious heroes infiltrating the Imperial Hdq. in Lothal to save Hera (I think) and the second episode of the night is ‘Dume’ as the crew works to find a new purpose and resolve.

 

 

The two new “Star Wars Rebels” episodes – “Jedi Night” and “DUME” – will also be available on www.DisneyNOW.com at 10:00 p.m. PT after they air on Disney XD.

Follow @DisneyChannelPR and @StarWars for the latest news on #StarWarsRebels,

and check out StarWars.com  for more exciting news on the series.

SaveSave

Posted in Animated, geek tv, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 31st, 2018 by Cherry

The stars of CMT’s Nashville will serenade a goodbye to fans with a final season concert at the Grand Ole Opry House on Sunday, March 25, 2018. Clare Bowen, Chris Carmack, Charles Esten, Jonathan Jackson, Sam Palladio, Lennon Stella, Maisy Stella, Rainee Blake, Kaitlin Doubleday, Jake Etheridge and Nic Luken are scheduled to perform in Nashville for U.S. fans with tickets on sale February 2, 2018. The NASHVILLE Farewell Tour heads to Europe in April with shows in the United Kingdom, Ireland and more. Cast members Clare Bowen, Chris Carmack, Charles Esten, Jonathan Jackson and Sam Palladio will head to the UK and Ireland in April for the NASHVILLE Farewell Tour. The shows will feature songs from the series as well as artists’ original material. Tour stops on the Farewell Tour include Birmingham, Leeds, Glasgow, Manchester, Cardiff, London, Dublin and Belfast.

“The cast of NASHVILLE are incredibly excited to play what is surprisingly their first true ‘hometown’ concert,” Steve Buchanan president, Opry Entertainment “It will be a bittersweet farewell to a city they love as production will soon wrap for the final season currently airing on CMT.”  

 

Tickets and VIP Packages for NASHVILLE In Concert: Final Season Celebration at the Grand Ole Opry House on March 25 will go on sale February 2 at 10 AM

The final season show was so popular in the United Kingdom and Ireland that they opened additional seats for the London O2 show on April 21 and shows were added in Dublin and Belfast for April 23 and 24 respectively.

For ticket information on all announced shows, go to https://www.opry.com/nashvilletour.  VIP ticket packages are available on all dates:

March 25            Nashville, TN (USA)                       Grand Ole Opry House

April 14               Birmingham                                  Genting Arena

April 15               Leeds                                            First Direct Arena

April 17               Glasgow                                        SSE Hydro

April 18               Manchester                                   Manchester Arena

April 20               Cardiff                                           Motorpoint Arena

April 21               London                                         O2 Arena

April 23               Dublin                                           3 Arena

April 24               Belfast                                          SSE Arena

 

The tour is produced by Opry Entertainment.   

“Nashville” airs in 225 territories worldwide. Since its debut, the show has inspired 22 soundtracks, including a Christmas album, which have collectively sold more than one million album units and over 5 million single-track downloads to date. It has also been nominated for multiple Emmy®, Golden Globe® and Critics Choice awards. Currently in production, “Nashville” is produced by Lionsgate and Opry Entertainment. The sixth season of “Nashville” premiered in the U.S. on January 4, with new episodes airing Thursdays at 9pm ET/PT only on CMT.  The 16-episode season will air in two parts, with the finale airing in the summer (exact date TBD). Long-time SVOD partner Hulu will continue to bring fans new episodes of “Nashville” by making them available to stream the day after they air on CMT, and the complete series can be streamed exclusively at http://www.hulu.com/nashville.

 

About “Nashville”

“Nashville” is set against the backdrop of the city’s music scene and follows the lives of country music superstars as well as the up-and-coming performers and songwriters trying to get ahead in the business. Music City can mean so many things to different people. In “Nashville,” musicians and songwriters are at the heart of the storm, driven by their own ambitions. Some are fueled by their creativity and passion for fame. Others struggle to cope with the pressures of success and are doing everything in their power to stay on top. “Nashville” stars Hayden Panettiere as Juliette Barnes, Clare Bowen as Scarlett O’Connor, Chris Carmack as Will Lexington, Charles Esten as Deacon Claybourne, Kaitlin Doubleday as Jessie Caine, Jonathan Jackson as Avery Barkley, Sam Palladio as Gunnar Scott, Maisy Stella as Daphne Conrad and Lennon Stella as Maddie Conrad. In addition, Season 6 features Ilse DeLange as Ilse, Rhiannon Giddens as Hallie Jordan, Cameron Scoggins as Zach Welles in recurring roles. The series is executive produced by Marshall Herskovitz and Ed Zwick (the creators of “Thirtysomething”), Steve Buchanan and Callie Khouri, who created the series.

 

About Opry Entertainment

Opry Entertainment®, a division of Ryman Hospitality Properties (NYSE: RHP), is a producer of multi-media entertainment experiences with primary interests in location-based entertainment and television and stage production. Based in Nashville, Tennessee, its core business segments include the world-famous Grand Ole Opry®, the historic Ryman Auditorium®, and legendary radio station 650 AM-WSM.

 

About CMT

CMT, a unit of Viacom Inc. (NASDAQ: VIA, VIAB), is the leading television and digital authority on country music and entertainment, reaching more than 92 million homes in the U.S. CMT, CMT.com and CMT Radio offer an unparalleled mix of music, news, live concerts and series and are the top resource for country music on demand. The network’s digital platforms include the 24-hour music channel, CMT Music, CMT App, CMT Mobile and CMT VOD.

 

About Lionsgate

The first major new studio in decades, Lionsgate is a global content platform whose films, television series, digital products and linear and over-the-top platforms reach next generation audiences around the world.  In addition to its filmed entertainment leadership, Lionsgate content drives a growing presence in interactive and location-based entertainment, gaming, virtual reality and other new entertainment technologies.  Lionsgate’s content initiatives are backed by a 16,000-title film and television library and delivered through a global licensing infrastructure.  The Lionsgate brand is synonymous with original, daring and ground-breaking content created with special emphasis on the evolving patterns and diverse composition of the Company’s worldwide consumer base.

Posted in TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 23rd, 2018 by Cherry

I’m so excited that Ash vs Evil Dead season 3 starts Sunday, February 25th at 9PM ET/PT on Starz with 10 frightening and funny episodes.

Ash is up to his old wastrel tricks after saving his old hometown from the <well> evil dead! We find his SECOND long lost daughter Kelly out to warn Ash after the latest Ruby massacre. Luckily Ash won’t be alone and will have his BFFs Pablo & Kelly by his side to fight the Deadites and their human allies. We also will get to know new friends and allies including the Knights of Sumeria and a old/new enemy with Ruby back to her old tricks (so to speak).

I recommend you grab some popcorn, remote and your favorite beverage so you can binge on the first two seasons to your screaming delight!

 

 

 

 

Bruce Campbell (The Evil Dead, “Burn Notice”) leads the cast, reprising the role of Ash Williams; Lucy Lawless (“Salem,” “Spartacus”) as Ruby, devises her most diabolical plan to defeat Ash and raise hell on earth; Ray Santiago (“Touch,” Meet the Fockers) as Pablo Simon Bolivar, forever loyal to Jefe (Ash) will realize his true destiny in the battle against evil; and Dana DeLorenzo (A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas) as Kelly Maxwell, whose single goal is to kill Ruby and end the Evil Dead torment once and for all.  New to the cast for season three are Arielle Carver-O’Neill (“House Husbands”) as Brandy Barr, Ash’s long lost daughter left in his care when her mother meets an untimely demise; Lindsay Farris (“Home and Away,” Primal) as Dalton, leader of an ancient order called the Knights of Sumeria, who seek Ash to lead their fight against The Dark Ones. Lee Majors (“The Six Million Dollar Man”) returns as Brock Williams to warn Ash from beyond the grave.

 

Sam Raimi serves as Executive Producer with Rob Tapert (Evil Dead, “Spartacus,” “Xena: Warrior Princess”), Bruce Campbell (Evil Dead, “Burn Notice”), Ivan Raimi (Drag Me To Hell, Spider-Man 3) and Rick Jacobson (“Spartacus”). Mark Verheiden (“Battlestar Galactica,” “Daredevil”) serves as Executive Producer / Showrunner.

Posted in geek tv, TV Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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