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February 2nd, 2017 by Cherry

Paley Center NY & LA are celebrating Black History Month with events for kids and adults! Visitors will be able to enjoy archived screening with Oprah Winfrey, Kerry Washington, Diahann Carroll, Lee Daniels, Cicely Tyson, and others share personal stories as they introduce historic TV moments from Julia, Soul Train, Roots, In Living Color, Scandal, Empire and many more programs. You’ll be able to see portraits of iconic talents and walk the red carpet with favorite stars! Attendees can share pictures on social with #PaleyTribute.

In Los Angeles, the monitors are on the second floor with the portraits. In New York, you can watch the full tributes in the Spielberg Gallery or go to the Library on the fourth floor to watch individual Tribute segments.

Attendees in both New York and Los Angeles will have the opportunity to watch classic and significant programs from the Paley Archive that celebrate and examine the African-American experience (see schedule below)

NY & LA: 
February 5 and February 12

12:15 pm
The Proud Family: “Party” (2002)
Penny Proud parties down in this episode of the popular animated family sitcom. (23 minutes)

12:39 pm
The Muppet Show: Lena Horne (1976)
Legendary vocalist Lena Horne drops by for a visit with Kermit, Miss Piggy, and the gang. (24 minutes)

1:04 pm
Bernie Mac Show: “The Night of Terror” (2005)
Zombies, played for laughs, because that’s what happens when you combine comedian Bernie Mac and kids. (30 minutes)

1:27 pm
Julia: “Am I, Pardon the Expression, Blacklisted?” (1968)
Groundbreaking sitcom about widowed nurse Julia Baker (Diahann Carroll) and her young son, Corey. (25 minutes)

1:51 pm
The Richard Pryor Show: Robin Williams, Charles Fletcher (1977)
Controversial in its time, this comedy-variety show hosted by comedian Richard Pryor lasted just four episodes, due to disagreements over content with the network (NBC). (51 minutes)

2:43 pm
In Living Color (1990)
Homey D. Clown clowns around in this installment of the influential sketch comedy show created by Keenen Ivory Wayans and Damon Wayans. (23 minutes)

3:07 pm
ABC Novel for Television: Roots (1977)
Premiere episode of iconic miniseries (celebrating its fortieth anniversary this year), based on Alex Haley’s book, focuses on Kunta Kinte, an African warrior who is captured by slave traders and brought to America. (37 minutes)

NY & LA:
February 19 and February 26

12:15 pm
Sesame Street: “Big Birds Pen Pal” (2002)
Sweep the clouds away with this diversity-themed episode of the great American children’s series, still running strong in its forty-eighth year.

1:16 pm
Justice League: “Legends Part 1” (2002)
Superhero superteam battles supervillains in alternate dimension. (22 minutes)

1:39 pm
Justice League: “Legends Part 2” (2002)
Superheroes vs. supervillains, part two. (22 minutes)

2:02 pm
Teen Titans: “Car Trouble” (2003)
Cyborg’s new supercar starts with T, and that stands for trouble. (22 minutes)

2:24 pm
The Oprah Winfrey Show: “Malcolm X” (1992)
Oprah chats with director Spike Lee about his film Malcolm X, plus Malcolm’s widow and daughter. (44 minutes)

3:09 pm

Paris: “Dead Men Don’t Kill” (1979)
Paris (James Earl Jones) tries to save a possibly innocent man on death row in this stark episode of the criminally underappreciated cop drama. (50 minutes)

 

 

4:00 pm
Hallmark Hall of Fame: The Piano Lesson (1995)
TV adaptation of August Wilson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama about a family in 1930s Pittsburgh and the conflict over an antique piano, a family heirloom with great symbolic value; starring Charles Dutton, Alfre Woodard, and Courtney B. Vance. (1 hour 40 minutes)

In New York and Los Angeles, families are welcome to enjoy family screenings and craft activities that celebrate African-American history and pop culture. 

 

Also in New York, the Paley Center’s Education department will present two workshops:

Wednesday, February 22, 2017; 2:00 pm
Screening and Discussion: CBS Reports: Who Speaks for Birmingham (1961)
Come see this rarely seen one hour in-depth news report which sought to let Birmingham residents, both black and white, speak on behalf of their community, then the center of international attention due to racial violence and strife.
Recommended for children ages 14 and older.

Thursday, February 23, 2017; 2:00 pm
Workshop: The Civil Rights Movement and Television
In the years between 1954 and 1965, more legislation was passed, more court decisions were rendered, and more social change was effected in the name of civil rights than ever before. The rise of the Civil Rights Movement paralleled the growing use of television in the United States. In 1950 television was still in its infancy, but by 1960, televisions were present in 90 percent of American homes. Television provided the American public with a means to witness the struggle for civil rights nearly in real time and led a more informed society to enact social change.  In this workshop participants view and discuss important television clips from the Paley Center’s civil rights archive.
Recommended for children ages 13 and older. 

Email eduny@paleycenter.org to make reservations.

Exhibits, Screenings, & Family Activities

February 2017, in Los Angeles & New York
Wednesdays to Sundays
12:00 to 5:00 pm (LA)
12:00 to 6:00 pm; Thursdays until 8:00 pm (NY)
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays.

 

The Paley Center for Media in LA
465 N. Beverly Drive,
at S. Santa Monica Blvd.
More info about visiting.

The Paley Center for Media in NY
25 West 52 Street
(Between 5th and 6th Avenues)
More info about visiting.

Posted in free, Los Angeles, Made in America, museum, Race in America Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

January 14th, 2016 by Cherry

Well I had a major blast from the past as I was checking my twitter account when I saw TCM was broadcasting the 1939 Oscar winning film Gone with the Wind. I don’t plan to hate watch the film that I grew up loving despite the romanticism of rape, slavery, black people  LOVING being slaves and general undisputed beauty of white women. No what I want to talk about is how when I was a kid watching it ALWAYS being Scarlet!

Embedded image permalinkI remember as a kid watching it every year on CBS and not seeing anything wrong with it. I loved that feisty minx who was willing to do what ever was necessary to survive. Let’s be honest heck I’d do a lot to survive when the chips were down. I’m just surprised that it took me so long (once again a young child) that mammy was a straight up slave and that I just didn’t see it. I think that a lot of people have a tendency to look at the pretty dresses, the David vs Goliath mythology and the fact that history has always glossed over the reality of what the Southern Rights were about so when you watch the film you just focus on the star crossed love of Rhett & Scarlet. The ultimate archetype of the beautiful filly just needing a strong hand to tame her. I can’t remember when they stopped the yearly broadcast or why. Was it because people protested/complained about the subject? Did they lose the broadcasting rights? I have no idea and I wonder how I’d feel about the film watching it now with the Black Lives Matter protests. I think I fell out of love with the film the first time I saw Roots. It’s one thing to see stagnant images or read dry words on a page but seeing Roots made it more real and reminded me that anyone in my family (me included) would have likely been enslaved if we had been alive at that time. Heck even if you were free it was a tightrope thin margin between being taken by force and sold into slavery.

So who’s watching the film tonight? What do you think about the romantic rose colored view of slavery, the Civil War and reconstruction.

Embedded image permalinkGONE WITH THE WIND (’39) earned 13 & won 8 in competition. That last scene explains why.

Posted in culture, Los Angeles Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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