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February 2nd, 2017 by Cherry

ESSENCE AND THE PALEY CENTER FOR MEDIA PRESENT:

“THE POWER OF OUR PRESENCE – AN EXHIBITION CELEBRATING THE 10-YEAR ANNIVERSARY OF THE ESSENCE BLACK WOMEN IN HOLLYWOOD AWARDS”

 

“We are beyond thrilled to partner with the Paley Center to present the Power of Our Presence exhibit—as Essence prepares to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Black Women in Hollywood Awards,” said Essence President Michelle Ebanks. “Experience the magic of the red carpet as it comes to life and shines a spotlight on the most influential and pioneering women in Hollywood.”

 

 

 

 

 

I’m so excited and happy to celebrate Black History Month with Essence Black Women in Hollywood Award Exhibition at the Paley Center for Media (Los Angeles). It’s been ten years since Essence Magazine began to recognize accomplished and creative Black Women with their yearly Oscar Week Luncheon.

 
This magical exhibition will include costumes from lead female characters from their hit TV series. In the collection will be the iconic white coats worn by Kerry Washington in Scandal, Tracee Ellis Ross’s scrubs from Black-ish and a costume from Taraji P. Henson’s “Cookie Lion” of Empire. As well as memorabilia, photos and footage form past luncheons will be on display, re-receations of the tables capes, images of past honorees, special video messages from Angela Bassett and Lynn Whitfield, a compilation footage of some the event’s most touching acceptance speeches and much more.

 

“We are so honored to partner with Essence in presenting this powerful exhibit in support of its special milestone anniversary,” said Maureen J. Reidy, the Paley Center’s President and CEO. “The Paley Center is proud of its ongoing commitment to preserving and celebrating African American achievements in television. This Essence exhibit is a signature part of our Black History Month celebration, which also includes screenings, educational activities and an onsite showcase of our own recent tribute.”

Essence’s Black Women in Hollywood Awards has celebrated black women in front of the camera and behind the scenes since 2008. Over the years they ave honored Oprah Winfrey, Lupita Nyong’o, Ava DuVernay, Viola Davis, Octavia Spencer, Taraji P. Henson and many more. This year’s event will shift from a daytime luncheon to an evening gala for the first time and will be held at the Beverly Wilshire in Beverly Hills, CA, on Thursday, February 23, 2017.

The Power of Our Presence exhibit will be open at the Paley Center’s Beverly Hills location (465 N. Beverly Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90210) from Wednesday, February 8 to Tuesday, February 28, 2017.

For more information about this exhibit, please visit Essence.com or paley.me/bwih, and follow Essence on TwitterInstagram and Facebook @essence, as well as the Paley Center on Facebook and Twitter @PaleyCenter for more updates.

The Essence Power of our Presence exhibit is presented by AT&T and the Minority Business Development Agency.

 

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ABOUT ESSENCE COMMUNICATIONS INC.

ESSENCE Communications Inc. (ECI) is the number one media company dedicated to African-American women, with a multi-platform presence in publishing, live events and online. The company’s flagship publication, Essence magazine, is the preeminent lifestyle magazine for African-American women, generating brand extensions such as the Essence Festival, Essence Black Women in Hollywood and Black Women in Music, Window on Our Women and Smart Beauty consumer insights series, Essence.com, and ventures in digital media (mobile, television and VOD). For 46 years, Essence, which has a brand reach of 14.2 million, has been the leading source of cutting-edge information and specific solutions relating to every area of African-American women’s lives. Additional information about ECI and Essence is available at www.essence.com.

 

ABOUT THE PALEY CENTER FOR MEDIA

The Paley Center for Media, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with locations in New York and Los Angeles, leads the discussion about the cultural, creative, and social significance of television, radio, and emerging platforms for the professional community and media-interested public. Drawing upon its curatorial expertise, an international collection, and close relationships with the leaders of the media community, the Paley Center examines the intersections between media and society. The general public can access the Paley Archive – including special African-American, Hispanic, and LGBT collections – and participate in programs that explore and celebrate the creativity, the innovations, the personalities, and the leaders who are shaping media. Through the global programs of its Media Council and International Council, the Paley Center also serves as a neutral setting where media professionals can engage in discussion and debate about the evolving media landscape. Previously known as The Museum of Television & Radio, the Paley Center was founded in 1975 by William S. Paley, a pioneering innovator in the industry. For more information, please visit paleycenter.org

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August 21st, 2016 by Cherry

I went to see Suicide Squad with very low expectations since I wasn’t impressed with most of the cast, am tired of the Joker/Batman/Superman and DC movies are uneven. I got my hopes a little bit at SDCC with all the fans excited about various characters from the film and all the fan experiences.

I was pretty spot on with my concerns from watching ads and reading about reshoots of the film after the dismal Batman vs Superman (if you want to have a movie about Batman and Superman fighting have a DAMN movie about them fighting smh). One of the first things I noticed and didn’t like is that the film is so dark even with the pop of candy color it just was so shadowy it was hard to make out the movie. The opening sequence didn’t pull me in and left me feeling and just wasn’t sticky so I’d like to say what I’D do if I were in charge of the movie/DC Films.

I would divide the film into 2 separate arcs. The first is showing why Amanda wanted to create the Suicide Squad and A.R.G.U.S. test capture of 3 metahumans. If I’d been writing the film it would have opened with some people being killed by a villain or even by a metahuman fighting a bad guy/gal and they would just be collateral damage and Amanda Wallis leading A.R.G.U.S. are unable to do anything. The next scene is the opening title/credits for the film with the comic book that has inspired the film. Amanda and her team are capturing metahumans and putting them in the bunker. They have a couple of lowlevel/weakones and after practicing they decide to grab a ‘big gun’. Amanda is in the war room with the ‘Most Wanted’ on the board decided who will be the first test of her men/women. She say’s first we grab Deadshot using the love of his child. Harley Quinn using her love of violence, sex and the Joker (he’s not on camera). The closing scene is the main gate closing of the facilities. Closing credits and than the scene opens with Amanda and the Generals in a skybox looking down at the prisoners using their powers. She says ‘their will always be metahumans wrecking havoc but we need our own to fight for humanity’. One general says ‘we can’t control these monsters’. Amanda smiles and opens a hand with a little pill and says ‘I’m always in control’. That’s the first film where humans go up against three bad guys/gals.

One of the residents of Apokolips, Granny Goodness is in charge of training (sometimes through brainwashing) new soldiers for Darkseid’s forces. She leads the Female Furies.

The second film would start with capturing the rest of the team with backstory and their first takedown as Suicide Squad of a better villain than the Enchantress and her bother . I would have loved ANY of these lesser villains that would have been hard to take down and were just visually more interesting. Also WHY did she shimmy while casting spells? I expected a pole to appear and 5 inch stripper heels to match the stripper outfit she had on to appeal to ‘fanboys’.

 

 

Grey Lora High ranking operative of the terrorist army Basilisk.

Artemis is the Shim’Tar (greatest warrior) of the Egyptian Amazons of Bana-Mighdall. For a short time, she also held the title of Wonder Woman.

Also the ‘big bad’ was a big boring snore and the fight scenes looked like a pretty

Agni was a member of the Jihad and had pyrokinetic abilities.

good video game but I don’t want to see a movie that looks like I could be playing it at home. I suppose my frustration is watching this film gave glimmers of what a blast it could have been but DC failed to make a good non Batman movie and is too busy playing catch up to Marvel that they are ignoring the incremental steps they took to introduce new characters and build up a world.

 

 

 

 

 

 

What did you think of the film? Geek out below with what you thought of the Suicide Squad.

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