Digital Entertainment World Conference for creators

If your in the tech, startup, entertainment, music, and creator/influencers field the upcoming 2019 Digital Entertainment World (DEW) is the place to be if you are creating or monetizing digital entertainment content. This year DEW is focusing on ‘The Power of Creativity and Influence’ with a list of speakers, breakout sessions and opportunity to network with the movers and shakers of numerous fields.

The two-day conference includes five tracks: Video/TV/Movies; Brands/Advertising; Games/Interactive; Music/Rights; and Creators/Influencers. Sponsors and and media partners include Akamai, McLaren Beverly Hills, Jam City, Sheppard Mullin, CloudFlare, O’Melveny & Myers LLP, StackPath, Dataclef, Exactuals, Rumblefish, Eurofins – Digital Media Services, Variety, Fusicology, ITA (Interactive Television Alliance), CMO Asia, Westside Digital Mix, Digital LA, Hypebot, The Game Audio Network Guild (G.A.N.G.), Parks Associates, Canadian Music Week, Dialoguefeed, WITI (Women in Technology International), Virtual Reality Reporter, VR/AR Association, IGDA (International Game Developers Association), AListDaily, IAEL (International Association of Entertainment Lawyers), Innovation & Tech Today, and WIGI (Women In Games International).

 

This year attendees will listen to what creators, brands and platforms look towards the future from audience, to fan engagement, and how platforms are changing entertainment. DEW is being held at the Marina del Rey Marriott just steps from the beach and located in the heart of LA’s thriving Silicon Beach with easy access to Santa Monica, Venice and Playa Vista. The event includes keynotes, fireside chats, presentations, panel discussions, tech demos, startup competition, innovative exhibitions, daily DJ music and performers and the best networking in the hotel’s Sinder Lounge.
DEW includes more than 75 unique sessions and 200 speakers on topics essential to the future of video, music, brands, marketing, gaming, AR/VR, and AI.
Speakers include:
Confirmed Keynotes & Fireside Chats:
Celiena Adcock, Head of Streaming-Entertainment, Facebook
Benjamin Grubbs, Founder & CEO, Next 10 Ventures
Jason Lake, CEO and Founder, Complexity Gaming
Gerrit Meier, CEO, Red Bull Media Network
Halsey Minor, Founder & CEO, Live Planet
Katie Nelson, Executive Producer, News Content, ABC News
Andrew Wallenstein, Co-Editor-in-Chief, Variety

Confirmed Speakers:
Wesley A’ Harrah, Founder, Hyper Orange
Karen Allen, President, Karen Allen Consulting
Fabian Alsultany, Director of Business Affairs, RChain Cooperative
Rene Amador, CEO, ARwall
Ray Annes, Marketing Director, Sony Music Entertainment
Lauren Apolito, SVP of Strategy & Business Development, HFA/Rumblefish
Kimberlee Archer, Head of Development Marketing AR/VR, Facebook
Russell Arons, SVP, General Manager, Machinima
Jonathan Azu, Senior Manager, Red Light Management
Tom Bash, VP, Product, ChefsFeed
Noah Becker, President, AdRev
Dwayne Benefield, Vice President, Head of PlayStation Vue, Sony Interactive Entertainment
Nancy Bennett, Chief Creative Officer, Two Bit Circus, Inc.
Eric Berman, Head of Business Development and Content Partnerships for VRV,  Ellation
Lisa Bilgrei, Branded Content Expert, Google
Lauren Bissell, Producer and the Founder, Immutable Music
David Bloom, Consultant and Columnist, Tubefilter, Forbes
Dae Bogan, Co-Founder and CEO, TuneRegistry
Hale Boggs, Partner, O’Melveny & Myers LLP
Chris Borelli, VP, Brand Partnerships, IMGN Media
Tripp Boyle, SVP, Connekt
Josh Brooks, SVP, Brand Strategy & Marketing, Jam City
Antony Bruno, Director of Communications, Royalty Exchange
Beau Bryant, GM of Talent, Fullscreen
Shelita Burke, Popstar
Jacob Carlson, Venture Capital & Senior Manager, Manatt Digital
Teri Nelson Carpenter, President & CEO, Reel Muzik Werks LLC
Jayne Charneski, Founder, Front Row Insights and Strategy
Jesús Chavez, CEO, Vertical Networks
Kevin Chernett, EVP – Global Partnerships & Content Distribution, Live Nation
Dawn Chmielewski, Technology Editor, Deadline Hollywood
Ted Cohen, Managing Partner, TAG Strategic
Jenni Cook, Head of Development, Dreamscape Immersive
Greg Cross, Chief Business Officer, Soul Machines
Eric Dahan, CEO and Cofounder, Open Influence
Kevin Day, VP Business Development & Strategic Relationships, Sound Royalties
Franco De Cesare, Director of Global Console & Online Gaming, Facebook
Robert DeFranco, VP, Sales and Development, The Future Group
Hayley Delaine, Founder, Trending All Day
Casey Dickinson, CEO, FTX Games
Colin Dixon, Founder and Chief Analyst, nScreenMedia
Allison Dollar, CEO, ITV Alliance
Tony Emerson, Managing Director, Worldwide Media & Entertainment, Microsoft
Zaid Farooqui, Product Manager for Stream, Cloudflare
Samantha Fernandez, Senior Director, AEG Global Partnerships
Rafi Fine, CEO, Fine Brothers Entertainment
Aubrey Flynn, former Chief Digital Officer and SVP, REVOLT Media & TV
Sid Fohrman, Partner, Sheppard Mullin
Javon Frazier, EVP, Strategy and Business Development, Studio71
Andi Frieder, Global Head of Industry, Entertainment, Spotify
Rob Gelick, Executive Vice President and General Manager, CBS Entertainment Digital
Jon Giegengack, Founder, Hub Entertainment Research
Gayle Gilman, CEO & Co-Founder, Ripple Entertainment
David Grant, President, POPSUGAR Studios
Keatly Haldeman, CEO, Riptide Music Group
Minard Hamilton, Managing Partner, Driver Ventures
Ann Hand, CEO & Chairman, Super League Gaming
Phil Hickey, EVP Brand and Marketing, Seriously
Hilary Hoffman, Global Executive Vice President Marketing, NBC Universal
Adam Hua, VP of Partnerships, CitizenNet, a Condé Nast company
Dick Huey, Head of Partnerships, Jaxsta
Mike Hurst, CEO & Co-Founder, Exactuals
Katie Ioffe, Director of Marketing, Digital Strategy, Mattel
Chauncy Jackson, CEO/Founder, Siri Music Group
TQ Jefferson, Vice President of External Development, FoxNext
Mike Johns, Executive Producer, Tech This Out
Ewan Johnson, Chief Creative Officer, Arcturus Studios
Gigi Johnson, Executive Director, UCLA Center for Music Innovation
Jocelyn Johnson, Startup Advisor
Kat Jones, Founder, Motiv PR
Brittani Kagan, Head of Talent, Portal A
Greg Kampanis, SR VP Business Development and Operations, Blue Ant Media
Gabrielle Kessler, VP of Experiential, Future Plc
Chang Kim, CEO & Founder, Tapas Media
Sam Kling, SVP, Creative Operations, SESAC Holdings, Inc.
Albert Kugel, Strategy Director, Giant Spoon
Harry Lang, VP of Product, Hallmark Labs
Folayo Lasaki, VP, Marketing, SoulPancake
Damon Lau, Head of Esports, United Talent Agency (UTA)
James Leaverton, VP of Ecosystems and CoFounder, StackPath
Kamiu Lee, CEO, Activate
Max Levine, Cofounder, MC Projects
Jim Louderback, General Manager, VidCon
Dave Madden, SVP, Global Brand Partnerships, Electronic Arts
Ashley McCollum, General Manager, Tasty
Yvette McDowell, Board Member, CCIA (California Cannabis Industry Association); Former LA City Prosecutor
Kate McGuire, Talent Manager, Fullscreen
David McTiernan, Director, Label Relations, Vevo
Marco Mereu, CEO, Framerate
Mickey Meyer, President of Network, Group Nine Media
Grant Michaelson, VP, Business Affairs and New Media, ABC Entertainment
Halsey Minor, Founder & CEO, Live Planet
Chris Misner, President of International, Roblox
David Mok, Director of Developer Partnerships, Skillz
Julia Moonves, VP, Sales & Business Development, pocket.watch
Karen Morgan, Co-Founder & Creative Director, Soma Innovation Lab
Helene Muddiman, CEO & Founder, Hollywood Elite Music & Media
Candice Mudrick, Senior Client Director, Newzoo
Dan Murray, President, Skybound Interactive
Vickie Nauman, Founder/Owner, CrossBorderWorks
Doug Neil, Executive Vice President Digital Marketing, Universal Pictures
Kym Nelson, SVP, Client Strategy, West, Twitch
Teri Nelson Carpenter, President & CEO, Reel Muzik Werks, LLC
Lisa Ong, Chief Culture Officer, CIVIC
Adam Ostrow, Chief Digital Officer, TEGNA
Panos Panay, VP, Innovation and Strategy, Berklee College of Music
Verena Papik, CMO, TuneMoji
Tony Parisi, Head of AR/VR Ad Innovation, Unity Technologies, Inc.
Sahil Patel, Media Editor, Digiday
Jennifer Perri, Vice President, Univision Creator Network
Tim Peterson, Senior Reporter, Digiday
John Petrocelli, CEO, Bulldog Digital Media
Chris Petrovic, SVP & Head of Corporate Strategy, M&A and Business Development, Zynga
Tina Pukonen, Head of Entertainment Strategy, Pinterest
William Quigley, CEO, Clearstone Ventures, OPSkins, and WAX
Neeta Ragoowansi, SVP. Biz Dev & Legal Affairs/Co-Founder, NPREX
Thai Randolph, EVP & General Manager, Laugh Out Loud
Phil Ranta, Head of Creators, Mobcrush
Leif Cervantes de Reinstein, Partner, Sheppard Mullin
Nelson Rodriguez, Global Director, Media Industry Strategy, Akamai Technologies
Carter Rogers, Principal Analyst, SuperData, A Nielsen Company
Jeff Rosenfeld, VP of Product, Music Audience Exchange (MAX)
Jessica Rovello, CEO, Arkadium
Ira Rubenstein, Chief Digital & Marketing Officer, PBS
Tom Ryan, Co-Founder and CEO, Pluto TV
Tracy Ryan, Founder & CEO, CannaKids
Johanna Salazar, EP & Head of Content, Strategy and Production, Two Goats
Robert Schefferine, VP Production, ABC Entertainment Marketing, Disney ABC Television Group
Ted Schilowitz, Futurist, Paramount Pictures
Russell Schneider, Head of Brand Partnerships, 9GAG
Lori Schwartz, Governor, Interactive Media, Academy of Television Arts & Sciences
Janice Scott, Chief Operating Officer & Head of Sales. Dataclef
Ari Segal, President & COO, Immortals LLC & Los Angeles Valiant
Michal Shapira, SVP of News Content Partnerships, Turner Ignite
Sephi Shapira, Founder & CEO, Escapex
Bennett Sherman, Co-Head, Digital Ventures, Gaming, ICM Partners
Ned Sherman, Partner, Manatt Digital; Founder, Digital Media Wire
Ketaki Shriram, Co-Founder, Chief Technology Officer, Krikey
Clark Stacey, CEO, WildWorks
Curtis Stafford, Former Head of Business Development, NCIA (National Cannabis Industry Association)
Steve Stewart, CEO & Co-Founder, Vezt
Jackie Subeck, CEO, Hey Jackpot!, Door Number Six
Chris Sumner, Senior Vice President, Business Development & Strategy, Refinery29
Josh Swartz, COO, Popdog
Daniel Tibbets, President & GM, El Rey Networks
Peter Trinh, Managing Director, International and Independent Film | Esport Groups, ICM Partners
Jay Tucker, Executive Director, Center for Media, Entertainment & Sports, UCLA Anderson School of Management
Rasty Turek, CEO, Pex
Benoit Vatere, Founder & CEO, Mammoth Media
Chrystine Villarreal, President, MIXhalo
Mia von Sadovszky, SVP / Group Strategic Planning Director, RPA
Mike Vorhaus, President, Vorhaus Advisors
Tina Walsh, VP Content Strategy, Tongal
Dan Weinstein, President, Studio71
Chris M. Williams, CEO & Founder, pocket.watch
Shelley Zimmerman, Co-Head, Awesomeness
To register, please go to http://www.dewexpo.com/registration/.
For information on limited sponsorship opportunities, please contact Tinzar Sherman at tinzar@digitalmediawire.com.

Wondercon 2018: Mark Rivers on Big Mouth

Composer Mark Rivers shares his experience on Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

       I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Mark Rivers

Rivers is a writer, producer, and composer for television. He is best known for his work on Parks and Recreation, and Kroll Show, and most recently Netflix’s Big Mouth.

 

Q: Can you talk to me about your writing process on Big Mouth?

A: Sure! The process usually goes something like… there are a lot of songs in the show. Not a lot, but they’re enough.

Q: There’s a lot.

A: They’re enough. There’s plenty of songs. Usually, as they’re writing the script, the writers and the producers will hit upon a moment where they think, “You know, this moment could use a musical number,” and that’s when they give me a call… “Hey, episode 208, we got a song coming up for you. We want to talk about that.” So we’ll either get on the phone or we’ll meet at their offices and just talk through what they want this musical moment to be. The style of music… we’ve done everything from big band to disco to flamingo… so I never know what’s coming down the pike. My job is to take that moment and to understand the characters’ voices enough, and to understand the story and the script enough to write lyrics that service that moment. So, I’ll go away and shuffle around in my backyard, write a bunch of lyrics, come up with a song, send them a demo, and… cross my fingers that they like it. Usually, they’ll come back with a few notes here and there, and then I’ll run with it… produce it, get the cast members in to sing it. Turn it into something that works in the show. Beyond that, the scoring is very different. That comes much later, when there’s an animatic to score to. We’ll sit down together and we’ll go through like, “That could use some music right there! What about that?” and we’ll have some temporary library music in place. “I can do something better and bigger, that fits the moment better,” It’s back and forth like that. I’ll send them stuff, they’ll have notes, and then back and forth until we’re all happy with it.

Q: How much freedom are you allowed in that process? Do they let you do whatever you want?

BMI Composer Mark Rivers talks working on Netflix’s Big Mouth during “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

A: Yeah, they trust me to run with it, and if they don’t like what I’ve done they’ll point out why… particularly lyrically. I’m really psyched that they’ve come to just trust me, lyrically. It’s always a bit difficult to inherit a bunch of lyrics… “Stick to these lyrics, don’t change anything…” It compromises the flow of a song. It’s just hard to write music that way. So they give me a lot of freedom… you know, once we’ve agreed upon a direction, the parameters that I should be working within. So yeah. Enough. I’m given enough freedom.

Q: Can I just say that Big Mouth is so, so funny, and I think that the music 

is the funniest part of it.

A: Oh cool! Really? Well, thanks. Thank you

Q: You did Parks & Rec, which is also so funny. I’m just a fan, I guess.

A: Oh good. I’m a fan of the show, too.

Q: What do you do in your free time?

A: I chase my kid around. I have an eight-year-old girl who’s not allowed to watch Big Mouth. I hang out with my wife and my kid.

Q: Do you listen to music? Or is it too much like work?

A: I try to. I have to make the effort to do it. My wife just bought me an Alexa, which immediately my daughter took over. Now she’s got someone to boss around. But I try to listen to more music. I don’t listen to as much as I used to… it’s hard to find stuff that’s like, “Wow, this is new and exciting!” like you did when you were a teenager and in your 20s. I find myself going back to stuff that I liked then… and I watch baseball and I drink beer, stuff like that. But that’s boring.

Q: So I’m really into choir music.

A: Yeah?

Q: Did you ever sing in a choir?

A: Did I ever sing in a choir? When I was a little kid. Well, in high school I sang in the Festival Chorale. I was a band nerd for a while, and then I joined the Festival Chorale because my friends were in it. They got to travel to Washington, D.C. every year and secretly party in the hotel rooms. That’s what I wanted to do.

Q: That’s what everyone wants to do when they go.

A: Yeah, yeah. It was more of the social aspect that drew me than the singing.

Q: Can I ask how you got into scoring, specifically T.V. shows?

A: Yeah… when I was a young man, I knew… I was playing in rock bands forever, but all my friends were comedians. I was living in Boston. I was friends with this whole budding Boston comedy scene. David Cross, who is a very old friend… and Marc Maron, and Louis C.K. and Jon Benjamin… these are all my friends and they liked my band and we would hang out. Years later when I moved to Boston, I had done Mr. Show with Bob and David– an old HBO sketch comedy show-I did that theme song… these guys were starting to get shows. My career as a rock musician had [raspberry sound effect, slams hand on table] grounded out. But these guys were taking off. I got into comedy writing, but also into writing music for these guys because they were old friends. They hired me because they knew me. I suppose they figured, “We can do worse than this guy.”

Q: Do you have a favorite composer?

A: I don’t. I don’t think I do. I mean… Beethoven? Have you heard of Beethoven?

Q: No. Who?

A: I don’t think I do. I have my favorite pop musicians. I was a huge Elvis Costello, XTC fan. That’s what most excited me when I was starting to write rock songs, pop songs. Bowie and The Beatles… other people, too. But I mean, that was sort of the foundation of all the stuff I liked. As far as T.V. composers there are people I like. I’ll hear music on other shows and think, “Oh, that guy’s pretty good! That Dave Porter guy is pretty good!” There’s a guy that does music on a kids show called Masha and the Bear, he writes these great little weird, off-kilter pop songs. They’re really good. Occasionally something will grab my ear, but I wouldn’t say… I’m too old to be a fan of anybody anymore.

Q: Do you read any comics?

A: I don’t. I don’t. The last comic I read… I liked Eightball. I was an Eightball fan. Dan Clowes… I know there are other people sort of like him and in the graphic novel world… I never kept up with it. I have a kid now…

Q: She doesn’t like comics?

A: Not yet! Maybe she’ll get into them. She likes reading. She likes books. She likes Judy Blume.

Q: I loved Judy Blume.

A: She was gonna read Are You There God, It’s Me Margaret and we were like, “No no no no no, not yet!” She’s eight.

Wondercon 2018: Tom Howe on Early Man and Wonder Woman

(L to R): Composers and panelists Mark Rivers, Tim Kiefer, Ryan Elder, and Tom Howe at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

by Aiyonna White, Contributor      

        I talked to the creative minds behind some of your favorite music pieces in your favorite T.V. shows! I had the chance to interview Ryan Elder, Tim Kiefer, Mark Rivers, and Tom Howe about composing for animation, comics, and their favorite music genres! I also self-indulgently ask them about choir music and show off my music tattoo as an attempt of camaraderie.

 

Tom Howe

Howe is an award-winning film and television composer and is most known for his work on Wonder Woman and Legend of Tarzan. He has recently worked on the new animated film Early Man.

 

Q: How’s your Wondercon going? Did you just get here?

A: I just got here, and it’s great. I didn’t realize it was such a big thing. Seeing everyone walking around in their costumes was fantastic. I think Americans do things bigger and better than anywhere else.

Q: Are you from England?

A: I am.

Q: I didn’t know that.

A: Yeah. I’m from there. Lived here four years, though.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about Early Man?

A: Yeah. I came on to that project 10 weeks from when we recorded which was November. My co-writer, who is Harry Gregson-Williams, he called me and asked me if I’d like to co-write the movie with him, and I then flew over to London to meet Nick Park and the team. Hung out there for a couple of days just getting to know everybody, visiting sets, and came back and then we started writing, trying to get things approved because we didn’t have a lot of time before we actually had to record. But the movie was fairly complete by that point. Some things change but a lot of the animation had been done because it takes like four or five years for them to get it together, because it’s very slow. It’s frame by frame filmmaking. It was just a great opportunity to be a part of and a fantastic process.

Q: Can you tell me how you got into composing?

A: My parents are both musical, and…my dad plays the organ, piano, guitar, and things, but he played the organ in church and my mom sung in the choir, so I did a lot of singing when I was younger. I started piano at about four or five or something. I took up the guitar at eight, I think, and then the clarinet later, a few things like that. I studied music and orchestration and things later on. I thought originally I was going to be in a band and be a songwriter. That’s what I really wanted to do, but I got a lot of people asking me to do string arrangements for songs, so I ended up going more in that direction. Somebody who I’d been in college with, who had nothing to do with music, but she got a job at a television channel. She called me they needed some music for a very small thing

Composer of Early Man, Tom Howe talks animation at “Music in Animation” panel at WonderCon on Sunday, March 25th in Anaheim, CA.

they were doing. A two minute long student film that they were putting out that day, and I did that. I’d suddenly found that I’d switched directions from what I thought I was gonna do to writing music for media. After that, that producer went on to do something else and I worked with him, then. One thing sort of snowballed to the other. I always knew I was going to do music, whether it was songwriting or film work or whatever.

 

Q: What music do you listen to in your free time?

A: Uhm….

Q: If you like to listen to music in your free time.

A: Funnily enough, because you’re on a film or T.V. show and you’re writing music it can be 18 hours a day for six-and-a-half days a week, sometimes seven when you’re getting near the end. There isn’t really a lot of time to listen to music outside of that, and I almost don’t want to. So I actually I find I listen to a lot of talk radio because I want to hear something but I need it to be almost like white noise that just distracts me rather than something musical. But if I get the chance… I’ve got three kids who listen to all kinds of different things. Usually, it will be whatever they’re listening to, because if we’re driving somewhere in the car, that will take priority over whatever I want to listen to.

Q: You talked a little bit about being in choirs?

A: Yeah.

Q: I love choir. Do you have a favorite choir composer?

A: Yeah, I love Morten Lauridsen, who I think is amazing. He and actually Eric Whitacre is another guy. Eric Whitacre is quite similar to Morten Lauridsen, but there’s a piece called “O Magnum Mysterium” by Lauridsen and I think it’s fantastic. The really close kind of voice writing. A lot of divisi cuts and clashes but… I don’t think there’s anything like the voice… strings get pretty close maybe, but I think that there’s nothing like just voices for everything, really. For emotion, for written things… one of the films I remember seeing growing up was a film called Cry Freedom. This sort of fantastic African choir, just the sound of it obliterated everything else in the movie in terms of the musical stuff. I thought they were amazing. But those are probably the two that I’ve been listening to, recently anyway. I think they’re both great.

Q: I sang that piece in high school.

A: Really?

Q: I loved it. It was beautiful.

A: It’s great, isn’t it?

Q: It was a lot of work.

A: I was gonna say, it’s not an easy thing to sing. There’s a lot or very close writing that then resolves, isn’t it? You’re clashing for quite a bit. But yeah, it’s a great piece of music.

Q: Can you tell me a bit about your role in the Wonder Woman movie?

A: Sure, yes. I was an additional composer on that movie for Rupert Gregson-Williams. That really involves… well, on a movie like that there was, again not a lot of time to put it together, but also there’s a lot of minutes of music. So, I’ll take on some scenes, basically, on Rupert’s behalf and I’ll either take a theme that he’s written-obviously all the main themes are by him and he’s doing the bulk of the movie- and I’ll work that theme into the scene that I’m doing. Or it could be a stand-alone scene that therefore isn’t hugely affecting the arc, then I’ll take that on just to kind of mean that he has not got to do it. So I probably took eight or nine, ten scenes in the movie, something like that. Just try to help out, really. It’s not uncommon on some of these big movies to have one or two other people kind of running alongside you trying to get it all done. Particularly when on a movie of that scale, where the picture’s changing a lot, so there’s a lot of musical conforms to do as well as writing. You’re permanently trying to keep up with the latest version of the picture. It’s just a lot of work that needs to be done. I’ve done that on several different movies for different people, but it’s a great thing to do, I think because you get the experience of working on a huge movie-you’re part of it, your music’s going into the film-but you slightly can stand back from the pressure of being in the firing line as the lead composer if they don’t like it at all. You can learn a lot doing it. It’s good fun. The movie turned out well didn’t it? It was huge. It was very successful.

Q: I loved that movie.

A: Second one’s coming.

Q: Do you read comics at all?

A: I haven’t for many years. A friend of mine collects the original ones and he seems to have an amazing collection of very valuable comics, as well. Do you collect them?

Q: I don’t collect them because I’ve seen that it’s not valuable. But it’s cool to read, I guess. If I really like a piece then I’ll buy it. How much freedom do get when you’re composing?

A: It depends on the project actually. Fairly- initially, anyway- a fairly big degree of flexibility in what you can do and theme ideas, and things. But, fundamentally, writing film music you’re always serving the filmmakers vision, the studio, the other people involved. So you have to respect that. I think sometimes, in the case of like Early Man. I was on for ten weeks, Nick Park was on for six years, so he’s going to have a better idea of what it is and what he wants than I am. I can’t absorb that in that short amount of time, and I have to start writing straight away. I’ve only got ten days before I’m trying to be at the same speed. I think you do get freedom, but at the same time people know what they want and you are trying to serve a higher purpose. Otherwise, you can go write concert music.

 

Follow Tom Howe on Twitter: @howe_tom

FOOD AND MUSIC FEST IN DOWNTOWN LA AT GRAND CENTRAL MARKET

GIVE BACK AND ENJOY GREAT MUSIC AND FOOD WITH CHEF BRUCE KALMAN AND MARIE PETULLA OF KNEAD & CO. 
JOIN FORCES WITH GREEN WISH 
TO SUPPORT FIVE LOCAL GREEN CHARITIES AT
FOOD AND MUSIC FEST IN DOWNTOWN LA 
AT GRAND CENTRAL MARKET
Screen Shot 2016-08-14 at 1.08.09 PM

Please join Celebrity Chef Bruce Kalman and Marie Petulla of KP Hospitality Group, Green Wish Founder actor Raphael Sbarge (TNT’s Murder in the First, ABC’s Once Upon a Time), and Green Wish President Scott Harris, COO Building Construction Group, and Green Wish Board Members Sharon Lawrence and Ed Begley, Jr. along with celebrity attendees including: Camille Balsamo (Murder in the First, Harbinger Down) & Reid Collums (Harbinger Down, GREEK), Currie Graham (Murder In The First), Lee Arenberg (Pirates of the Caribbean, Once Upon A Time), Lombardo Boyar (Murder in the First), Jamie McShane (Bloodlines, Murder In the First), Bill Pullman (Independence Day), Nicholas Guest ( Madam Secretary, Sleepy Hollow) & Pamela Guest (Cleopatra Backstage), KJ Smith (Queen Sugar, Family Time),  James Anderson (NFL Player New Orleans Saints), International Model Carissa Rosario and Saga Elmotaseb (Spice It Up With Saga), among others at KNEAD to Give Food & Music Fest – Powered by Green Wish. With LIVE entertainmentby Winslet andChef Bruce Kalman’s band, Foie Grock and food by Knead & Co. Pasta Bar + Market, Ramen Hood, DTLA Cheese, Bar Moruno, Valerie Confections and Coolhaus.

BUY TICKETS

 

Green Wish and Knead & Co. Pasta Bar + Market are teaming up for The KNEAD to Give Food & Music Fest – Powered by Green Wish, a food and music charity event which is a fusion of great food, live entertainment and passionate people who will come together to keep LA Green to support five local Los Angeles charities: Food ForwardHoneyLoveMuir Ranch PasadenaHollywood Orchard, and FoLAR.

 

KNEAD & CO. pasta bar + market @ Grand Central Market

317 S. Broadway
Los Angeles, CA 90013
Food Forward-Food Forward rescues fresh local produce that would otherwise go to waste, connecting this abundance with people in need, and inspiring others to do the same.
HoneyLove – HoneyLove is a Los Angeles based non-profit conservation organization with a mission to protect the honeybees by educating our communities and inspiring new urban beekeepers.
Muir Ranch Pasadena – In 2011, a dedicated team of volunteer teachers and students began converting 1.5 acres of the John Muir High School campus into an urban farm. Muir Ranch grows a variety of flowers, vegetables and fruit that are included in weekly CSA boxes as well as school cafeteria lunches. Students can complete community service or internship graduation requirements by enrolling in classes at the Ranch. Muir Ranch also provides paid internships to students, which are funded by private donations, special events, farmer’s market sales, and subscriptions to the produce box program (CSA).
Hollywood Orchard– To better neighborhood quality of life by operating a community orchard that is a teaching model for sustainability through its workshops on growing fruit locally, and sharing the food in open-air events held in the Beachwood Canyon community, outreach communities, and food-charity organizations.
FoLAR Is a non-profit organization founded in 1986, whose mission is to protect and restore the natural and historic heritage of the Los Angeles River and its riparian habitat through inclusive planning, education and wise stewardship. Once home to steelhead and grizzlies, the Los Angeles River meandered through wetlands, marshes, willow, alder and sycamore, providing desperately needed water for the region. Now running over 50 miles long – from the suburbs of the San Fernando Valley to the ocean in Long Beach – the Los Angeles River flows through 14 cities and countless neighborhoods. When the Army Corps of Engineers initiated a flood control project in the late 1930s, they began the process of paving 80% of the River, creating the world’s largest storm drain. Over the ensuing decades, the River that had been the sole water supply for the City of Los Angeles before the Los Angeles Aqueduct was completed in 1913 almost disappeared from public consciousness. With the cement came a perceptual shift: the River no longer existed. Instead, it was a “flood control channel,” a no-man’s land, surrounded by fences and signs.
Green Wish – is a grassroots, non-profit organization that funds local, green organizations through customers’ small donations at local retailers. Put simply: We’re a charity that helps fund the green projects in your neighborhood!
Green Wish was founded in 2009 by actor/producer Raphael Sbarge, after the birth of his first child, “I was struck by how alive I suddenly felt as a father,” he explained. “Conversely, I also felt remarkably vulnerable and defenseless to protect this little person’s journey in a world as vast and complex as ours. I had to ask, ‘What can we do to contribute in any small way to leave the world a better place than when we found it?'”
The answer: Green Wish – we help people to support a movement – not just one organization, but multiple ones. When you donate to Green Wish, you’re actually helping numerous environmental groups, right in your own community.
Green Wish partners with local retailers, which place our donation cards right at their cash registers. Customers can “buy” and add Green Wish donations on to their purchase at the retailer.
These donations are collected by local Green Wish chapters and distributed regularly to area organizations that have been carefully vetted. The board of directors in each chapter evaluates and selects deserving organizations with track records of good work across the green spectrum, focusing on air, water, earth and environmental education. * Ninety cents of every dollar* goes to your local green groups.
We started in Los Angeles with a chapter supporting nine organizations in Southern California. We are spreading across the country with the ultimate goal to start Green Wish chapters across the country, all supporting groups in their communities.

 

Geek Gift: Star Trek: The Ultimate Voyage at the Pantages

Any fan of Star Trek, the Pantages or beautiful music would love to find the gift of Star Trek the Ultimate Voyage Concert Tour 2016 at the Pantages April 1 & 2, 2016.

“I could not deprive you of the revelation of all that you could accomplish together, of a friendship that will define you both in ways you cannot yet realize.” – Star Trek, 2009

STAR TREK: The Ultimate Voyage
April 1 – April 2, 2016

Experience 50 years of groundbreaking and wildly popular music from the Star Trek franchise with an impressive live symphony orchestra while the most iconic Star Trek film and TV footage is simultaneously beamed in high definition to a 40-foot wide screen.

2 Hours (Including Intermission)

 

STAR TREK: The Ultimate Voyage

April 1 – April 2, 2016
2 Hours (Including Intermission)
Recommended for All Ages (Children under 5 will not be admitted to the theatre. All patrons must have a ticket.)

Experience 50 years of groundbreaking and wildly popular music from the Star Trek franchise with an impressive live symphony orchestra while the most iconic Star Trek film and TV footage is simultaneously beamed in high definition to a 40-foot wide screen.  This live event is perfect for music lovers, filmgoers, fans and those looking for a unique concert experience.

STAR TREK: The Ultimate Voyage brings 50 years of Star Trekto concert halls for the first time ever.

This lavish production includes an impressive live symphony orchestra and international special solo instruments. Experience the franchise’s groundbreaking and wildly popular musical achievements while the most iconic Star Trek film and TV footage is simultaneously beamed in high definition to a 40-foot wide screen.

The concert will feature some of the greatest music written for the franchise including favorites from Star Trek: The Original SeriesStar Trek: The Motion PictureStar Trek II: The Wrath of KhanStar Trek IV: The Voyage HomeStar Trek: InsurrectionStar Trek: The Next GenerationStar Trek: Deep Space NineStar Trek: Voyager and much more. This live event is perfect for music lovers, filmgoers, fans and those looking for a unique concert experience.